I've got a treat for you, and I hope you love it (at least like it). I am writing! Yet, a lot of my writing is unavailable to the public sphere until going through publication processes! So, I am creating a FREE public story which YOU are able to read via Wattpad! Now, you can experience some more of my storytelling: http://my.w.tt/UiNb/4Do8PXvgkGFREE, enjoy!

Since I'm always reading: I'm adding books I'm done reading (from August 2017 on, with blurbs) in a list (which will be on Goodreads as well). Happy Reading!

Investing well in yourself is a smart idea. Now—investing smart is very important. I have an interest in stocks and Acorns is an investing avenue which helps invest some of my money well with smart investments. If you join with my link, you and I will receive five dollars ($5.00) in our Acorn accounts: https://www.acorns.com/invite/?code=4FHGXB! Let's reap the benefits together, enjoy!

Happily Ever Afters

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Happily Ever Afters by Elise Bryant is a young adult romantic dramedy about a sixteen-year-old girl, Tessa Johnson, aspiring to be an author, struggling with anxiety due to her insecurities and impostor syndrome after getting into a creative school. I randomly buy the book in Barnes and Noble as a part of a Buy One, Get One 50% off deal. I enjoy the looseness of the story telling which seems to be Tessa's voice: I feel like I'm reading a diary and loose text messages an author is trying to make sense of completing publicly, in the form of a story, while the author is living the story. The text has social aspects rounding characters' experiences which approach acknowledging a human as a human and connecting socially in a diverse social world at large.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Song of Fire and Ice: A Clash of Kings

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin is the second book in A Song of Fire and Ice series. I like the introspection George R. R. Martin offers through the characters, and, even more so, the outrospection in relation to particular characters. For example, what an astounding character role Tyrion hosts! What I'm quite clearly noticing now in A Clash of Kings is the aggressiveness toward dismantling and manipulating of children (though set very clear in A Game of Thrones, the first book in A Song of Fire and Ice series) as means to an end or no end. What more of a poster child than Tyrion, to be like the PTSD representation of all children from/in a savage world—always a door, an eyeglass, a mirror to immoral characteristics. What an aware-well-rounding character Tyrion is! For so many to only see outward falsely and never inward honestly—as far as the author shares—sets Tyrion in a role most distinct to any other character. Tyrion is a conduit of truth about society he maneuvers, heavily revealing delusionality about him, ironically, not a product of his environment though so in a resourceful sense for his life—a peace of mind, in a world of individuals suffering from intoxications of coin, cunning, and narcissm. This is not a justification for Tyrion's behavior, just an appreciation for a character set so well in the text, quite unlike any other so far, in connection with major themes in the series so far like children, family, and succession. I like the way each chapter allows for one to focus on one particular character though more characters are always in a mix. The text has an appendix in the back which helps with returning to reading the text after a while to continue engaging the story sensibly. I like the book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Vagina Book: An Owner's Manual for Taking Care of Your Down There

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Vagina Book: An Owner's Manual for Taking Care of Your Down There by The Thinx Inc. Team, Dr. Jenn Conti, MD, and Daiana Ruiz (Illustrator) is an insightful text about healthily approaching a vagina in relation to a broader spectrum of better health connecting to as well as branching from a woman. While browsing Barnes and Noble, I find the book in an art section before reserving the text then picking it up a day after the reservation expiration to find it, with the help of an employee, in a health section. I like reading a book of the sort because I think it's important to be cognizant of a woman's body/a body one might want to care more about, and I like to have a book of the sort in my library of books so a woman that decides to spend time with me may learn a bit of herself (if she doesn't already know information I may already/have available) especially/particularly when browsing my library of books. I find the text to be very informative of menstruation which I have a deeper respect for—through better understanding—now. I find certain aspects of the text can/need to be a lot clearer especially regarding human development as well as sexual communication boundaries. I think the style of the book overall between textures of the cover and pages, illustrations, and font styles makes the book like an adult-child-friendly book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Four)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Four) by Kintetsu Yamada divulges, thematically, a girl/woman might not like/be able to like a boy/man a same reason or way a boy/man might like a girl/woman in an overall theme of there being no clear line of relational understanding that brings a couple together to stay together hence the importance of communication beyond visceral senses (though Asako and Natori never completely separate from the visceral). Dating after college, and work in relation to being in a relationship takes center stage in the text: the text offers a couple of interesting perspectives about work in relation to being in a relationship which I find shows different emphases a couple or an individual may put on work and/or a relationship. All in all, volume four explores the importance of communication, of even the tiniest detail, and ways good communication can really affect a relationship in a destressing way (whether a romantic relationship or not). There is almost no fan service in volume four which the author acknowledges with an abrupt teaser bonus chapter of Natori reminiscing about a sexual time with Asako.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Three)

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Three) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is a very funny dramedy. The feeding rules of Succubi create an interconnecting open world of sexual possibilities which in the text leads to Succubi feuding. Between the sexualness in the story, there are short deep moments about Renta being a man seemingly only Succubi seem to like (which isn't surprising though is kind of ironic because of ways certain Succubi like him) though Saki's approaches are different than other Succubi's approaches (even while Saki abides by the Succubi's rules and is taking a new route to acclimating herself with Renta's body sexually). I really like volume three.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Feminine Mystique

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Whether anyone has a qualm with Playboy does not dismiss a fact that Playboy is one of the most groundbreaking editorials in history to ever cover topics, particularly taboo topics, even now relevant, and not so taboo in/to modernity (consider the times when Playboy starts publishing). 


How do you think I come to discover The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan? A Playboy interview between David Sheff and Betty Friedan in the September 1992 issue of Playboy. I'm a collector, and my pages aren't sticking together.


The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan explores being a woman, a purposeful human, living with goals and meaning, beyond being an American housewife as the standard of fulfillment for a woman's life. Through explorations of economic, social, political, feminine, and masculine—human—mystiques, Betty Friedan brings the importance of having goals and living with purpose to the forefront of humans being mindfully. In my lifetime so far, I've come to experience many, if not all, situations directly or indirectly within the text hence one reason I am patient with individuals in general though particularly women (largely due to not ever knowing a/ situation(s) a person may be coming from as well as acknowledging a person does not know the same of me—which is part of the reason for me apologizing to anyone I ever feel I may have hurt in my lifetime so far—if anyone feels deserving of an apology for a reason I'm not aware of—I'm sorry. I mention this in light of a discovery in my lifetime, a person can find/make offense from a completely good-kind-non-ill-action-or-non-ill-intention in the form of a gesture because that's a way a person chooses to be/respond for whatever reason. I never dismiss the potential of another side to a story and/or another story altogether). 


I live as fully as I may. Betty Friedan encourages living a self-actualizing-purposeful-full-life—to be/feel whole, human. In the text, the economic-social-political nuances of masculinity and femininity are relevant and sound with modern developmental parameters—likely for the perpetuity of time, even with advancing/additional technologies—each nuance to a different degree. The book focuses on American culture primarily though is culturally relevant globally, an aspect of a nuance may have a culturally different acknowledgement/meaning though resembles a situation in the text (Friedan expounds upon this point in the text). I think the topics of this book are very important, and that The Feminine Mystique is a book to reference for a lifetime.


I remember going to therapy twice. The first time to address in and grow through a professional setting to handle certain types of situations with a professional. Bringing up any situation in an unprofessional setting may leave one to get an/ unprofessional response(s) and an/ undesirable result(s). The second time I go to therapy really results in my understanding the necessity to move on one's own in the world beyond any trauma—without therapy though with good-proper efforts, direction, purpose, and self-care. After reading books about my experiences (that I go to therapy for) and writing about my experiences for analytical purposes, in reflection (more so clearer now though apparent before differently)—a different way of crying for help though seeking a/ resolve(s) (which I've a history of doing in myriad ways), I feel amazing—because of my self-culturing, like a continuation of my life, beyond any trauma(s) I've come to experience (a conversation for my future romantic life partner, and, God willing, our immediate family like our children, necessarily). At my current point in life, after doing all the necessary personal work (and I'm always finding a way to improve), I attest The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan has insights of which I feel to be useful for me (considering varying stages of my life so far) and may be relevant for anyone seeking to be more culturally aware of developmental parameters of a human being. I'm going to harp on certain important topics for the rest of my life like literacy, critical thinking, good sex, being a good person—to name a few. I'm beyond so much because of choice practical processes. I think reading a book of the sort can help one become more aware of certain developmental parameters though personal growth usually happens from actually making choice action in one's personal life.


As a single heterosexual man supportive of good women (especially of the autonomous-fit-intelligent-salacious type, to say the least), I think it's important for me to be as aware as possible especially as economic-political-social situations are developing, human minds need to be operating properly in order to secure a more sensible equilibrium particularly in relation to living standards without impeding on a human's rights especially concerning privacy. Even with improvement, purposeful growth and learning is always possible. As many more social nuances are ever present in modernity, mystiques are even more, varyingly—bringing more value to Betty Friedan's book, The Feminine Mystique.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Two)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Two) by Kintetsu Yamada definitely does not provide as much fan service as volume one though focuses on other aspects of getting to know different sides of a person in a relationship, in different social settings, slowly including external individuals more intimately. Indications of love making are seemingly present though more so private (like the bedroom scene with Natalie and Blake in Isn't It Romantic (2019) except without the replays—unless one keeps flipping the pages back and forth while using one's imagination—) which actually helps set emphasis on the other happenings pertaining to Asako and Kotaro's relationship, emotionally and socially. I like the character profiles and translation notes at the end of the manga. Concerning the end of the manga, volume two has a few more interesting tidbits than volume one.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume One)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume 1) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is the meet cute and introductory portion of Renta, a thirty-five-years-old virgin, and Saki, a twenty-year old Succubus, living together. This manga is full of fan service in line with this (so far) ironic-sweet story. After purchasing the manga from Barnes and Noble, tearing the plastic wrap, then reading the manga, I'm looking to finish reading the series. Renta and Saki are in a seemingly perfect situation though Renta is choosing to be considerate of Saki after discovering one of her reasons for not partaking in normal behaviour (for a Succubus). Both Renta and Saki seem to be very horny (and comically considerate of each other), and Saki is a nice Succubus which makes the fantasy the story is offering pleasanter.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth Century Britain

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth Century Britain by Jonathan Farina is an extensive exquisite delve into spherical understandings of certain common words of British print in the nineteenth century. The author is one of my graduate school professors. I remember enjoying his classes beyond his teaching style due to the topics, extending conversations, and my discoveries through choice research—all part of a wonderful graduate school experience. The text explores nineteenth century Britain through choice words (semantics through certain common words of British print in the nineteenth century), intricately analyzing language—derivations. The text is an intricately intellectual scholarly work with comedic tinges. I consider the text valuable beyond realms of English majors.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Nothing Personal

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Nothing Personal by James Baldwin is a collection of essays examining human experiences that may affect human characteristics as well as social dynamics. After an engagement of curiosity, standing in a line at an airport, recognizing James Baldwin’s face, the book becomes a gift to me from the prior owner of the text. The author dissects societal systems and systems of technology to identify ways in which certain parameters connect directly with humans’ physically and psychically particularly in relation to an American developmental experience though relevant in regard to any experience in relation to similar societal systems and systems of technology which the text references. I think the text is worth reading and thinking about in regard to modernity.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

You Are Not So Smart

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


You Are Not So Smart by David McRaney is a recommendation from a discussion of a random though pleasant invitation. Reading the text, I feel like I am reviewing a more entertaining version of the information from an undergraduate PSYCH101 class due to the additional commentary between the explanations of psychological and marketing parameters in relation to social developments as well as sciences. The text seems to root itself within the psychological, marketing, and social which I think is important to understand while reading the text because there are outliers the text does not consider which limits the text, particularly, to the fields I afore mention. Even so, the text proves insightful and may help one navigate toward becoming a more mindful individual.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Ludwig Wittgenstein is an exploration of the absoluteness of meaning and the meaningless through parameters of death and life, the existent and the non-existent via parameters of Philosophy (equations—logic—reason—). I feel like I am reading an assignment with a page limit by the end of the book because of the way the last few pages seem to summize the intentions and purposes of the text, for the reader (seemingly in case the jargon doesn't make clear, immediate, or much sense). I like the text and find Wittgenstein's examination of life like a philsophically intense motivational text urging the reader to be present and make one's life of one's own because only one can bring any meaning into one's life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

I Am Golden

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


While about encouraging reading, I re-encounter two individuals which share with me books of their choosing for practical use in a culturally enrichening sense in a classroom. I'm glad about the chance to read both books; in reading order; the first book is Mae Among the Stars, writing by Roda Ahmed, illustrations by Stasia Burrington, and the second book is I Am Golden, writing by Eva Chen, illustrations by Sophie Diao. This review will focus on I Am Golden. The text encompasses aspects of Chinese culture reflective through an individual, particularly Mei, receiving a form of generational support, and, I think, can encourage an individual, family, to culturally, as well as self, identify in an aware, confident, empowering, and respectful way. The illustrations are so vibrant and fill the pages very well in tune with the writing. I find the author and illustrator's stories in the end about aspects of their upbringing being Asian to be very powerful. As an ally, one that attempts to support good of cultures/individuals of different experiences especially outside of one's own experiences though potentially relatable, I find myself trying to listen as good as I may especially as there is only so much I may reasonably do at times, respectfully, respecting boundaries. I don't condone acts of hate. I find the text empowering and enlightening.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Circe

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


After asking a Barnes & Noble representative for a book recommendation, I decide to read the text. Circe by Madeline Miller is about a half-divine, half-nymph, witch that struggles coming into being of her own, through her abilities, between worlds of the immortal and mortal as well as between familial relations/tendencies of her youthful past in tandem with familial development of her present maturer years. The text is like a fan fiction of Greek Mythology which offers deeper-rounder perspectives of/branching from, a character from an interestingly popular group of beings in Greek Mythology, the nymphs, and the character's lineage. I like the text's approach concerning Greek mythology. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well. 


Due to inquiring of a student about a book for a class, I learn about Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People by Robert and Michèle Root-Bernstein, a text engaging purposes of creative processes, and imagination. As a creative, I appreciate the text as a form of affirmation (not in a validation seeking sense) since I am properly tending my creative responsibilities. The text offers exemplar methods that may help one creatively, and theoretically expounds creativity. I find the text is a good reminder to all to respect creative processing with, at least, more grace—patience, since each creative process can be quite different from person to person. I find the text enjoyable and very insightful.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe is a book-play about a man of learning—knowledge—that makes a pact with Lucifer after coming to experience magic through a somewhat disdainful-reverential manner. One afternoon while writing in my apartment, I ponder on the phraseology, misery loves company, and find it originates from—its rootings are in—The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus (the character Doctor Faustus of German literary origins). So, I decide to read the text, and find the phraseology (in Latin, in the version of the text I read), "Solamen miseris socios habuisse dolores," which translates to "Solace of the wretched to have companions of pain" (Marlowe, 2020, page 28).  After reading the story, I find the adage is a wonderful line set in the play, of the like. The version I read doesn't have translations so requires a bit of research, and, though the English seems of antiquity, I find it's comprehendible. I like the text, a good read, I think, and I'm glad about reading it.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Marlowe, Christopher. (2020). Doctor Faustus. Independently Published.

The Republic

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Republic by Plato (translated by Benjamin Jowett) is an extensive dialogue between Socrates, Thrasymachus, Polemarchus, Glaucon, Adeimantus—a variety of individuals though ends up heavily between Socrates and Glaucon—about developing a perfect society branching from as well as revolving around inquiries concerning justice and injustice flowing from ideas analyzing makeups—potentialities—of an individual (heavily in accordance with developments of a State). Each character carries a tone of a language (which I think is a unique colloquial touch better situating developments and understandings of the dialogues overall), the text overall seems to be a philosophical comedy respecting realities pertaining to/of the philosophical dialogues within the text. To experience and observe that which is in this extremely relevant text, happening—present—in actuality, whether abroad or near in space and time, speaks volumes on human conditions and societies. The text ends on a comically-wonderful beat of hope and life. I'm glad about reading The Republic.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Upon running into multiple acquaintances, I find myself agreeing to join my acquaintances to a dinner party. I have a chance to meet and converse with individuals around a table, about reading, and its importance. One of the adults asks me if I want an alcoholic drink to which I politely decline. He comically finds shock because I don't drink, do drugs, or smoke. He mentions that every person has a vice, and, I admit to him that some might consider one area of which I have a strong interest in, a vice, though I think, appropriately, it's not. As natural as I might consider sex, it's not always a normal topic for conversations.


So, I find myself buying then reading a book primarily focusing on a form of oral sex, cunnilingus, greatly in connection with parameters of orgasming; She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman by Ian Kerner might not be most up to date with certain data (percentages) though the techniques in the text can be timeless. I really like the diagrams of techniques and vaginas. This is not erotica though I find myself nearly salivating reading the text. One point I really find interesting is about vaginal agenesis, a condition in which a woman's reproductive system (inclusive of the vagina) does not fully develop. I find a lot of familiar information, and I find new bits of information that I think important in connection to having more meaningful relationships branching from more meaningful sexual relations.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Music to My Years: A Mixtape Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Music to My Years: A Mixtape Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up by Cristela Alonzo is largely about her upbringing particularly in relation to her journey toward becoming, not only a more aware entertainer, but a woman of her own choice merits. I find out about the author randomly scrolling through Twitter, then decide to buy the book after reading a tweet she pins from October 13, 2019: https://twitter.com/cristela9/status/1183450846819995648?t=Np-ThvHAlwy6xj_ZrW2MrQ&s=19. I mainly find surprise reading stats of her tweet ("1st Latina to create/write/star in network sitcom/1st Latina to star/lead Pixar movie") because Pixar has a lot of films, and television networks are decades old! I like the book. I think the author maintains a comical tone throughout the text though grounds the text in serious topics as well as situations (like bullying, healthcare, etc.) progressing through chapters thematically by songs.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne 

A Grief Observed

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


On my way to the Little Yosemite Valley Backpackers' Campground, I meet a couple for a second time. The wife shares a sentiment of a quote she finds profound concerning grieving, and loss from C.S. Lewis's book, A Grief Observed. I think a lot about the sentiment concerning a loss of a person one loves making one feel like one is missing a limb. To get a better grasp of the sentiment, I decide to read the book largely exploring C.S. Lewis's responses toward God, the loss of his wife, and his life as is, in general, though after the loss—confusing, happy, and miserable, seemingly-knowingly of personal choice, a very conflicting personal processing. I think the text is a good way to explore processing loss especially for anyone trying to better navigate grieving, loss, and/or anyone in a deeply serious relationship that wants to engage in a conversation of the sort as a potential form of preparation—reasonable peace of mind. My version of the text has a foreword by Madeleine L'Engle (author of the Time Quintet) which I think is a good supplemental piece to read prior reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Chronicles of Narnia

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well. 


While helping one of my brothers and his family pack up to move a time ago, I remember finding my sister-in-law has two collections of the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. At a younger age, I remember having to read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe though never any of the other books, and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is the second book in the series. So, I decide to read all of the books in order, and I appreciate them all though each to a different degree.


The Magician's Nephew sets the tone of most of the books. I think it's a great introduction into the realm of Narnia which ties in so well with The Last Battle (more so than the other books do), and I think it is fun to read. 


The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a decent story in the series which really becomes like a reference point of deeper magic, meanings, and rules of Narnia which help explain parts of journeys in Narnia at latter points in the series. 


The Horse and His Boy is one of the most critical pieces in the series broadening ideas of worlds in connection with Narnia. I think it's one of the more serious books in the series, and, is a shifting point in tone in the series.


Prince Caspian is a good story sifting ideas of ruling magics/powers in Narnia, and an introductory into more adventurous routes thereafter through The Voyage of the Dawn Treader as well as The Silver Chair; I feel like I'm reading a mini-series in a major series through these three books, and I find these three books to be quite enjoyable in different ways than the books in the series surrounding them though carrying tones of all the stories prior. Even so, leaning toward the end of the series C.S. Lewis funnels more comedy, fun, happiness, and Narnian philosophy in The Last Battle after topsy-turvy journeys in topsy-turvy ways (which seems to really be the style of writing in the series) to end on a light note. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


The Mis-Education of the Negro

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson is a collection of reflections by the author. I find the text informative particularly in relation to history in general, African historical roots specifically. I buy the text as a part of a learning process for research purposes. I find the author’s reflections to be aware as well as relevant albeit a bit extreme in varying instances though I do not know the author's life experiences growing in (or the circumstances personally--concerning--) the early 20th century and late 19th century amidst so many different economical and social situations. Even so, I find the author’s reflections to be encouraging toward seeking routes of proper communal-economic growth, self-independence, particularly mental independence, for all individuals, even as the reflections are through lenses analyzing individuals of African descent in development with wider diasporas.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I believe exploring and learning about sexual health is extremely important. If/When someone and I decide to form a relationship, I'm going to continue reading books about sex (at least one a year), and, hopefully, my future partner and I will be coreading (at least one a year) books on an aspect of sex. As much as Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price seems to mainly be about individuals above forty years of age, the emphasis on sexual development, exploration, and health is relevant for all ages particularly for capable individuals willing to comprehend explorations of one's personal sexual developments/health. The text is full of expert advice and testimonies. I find the text very insightful, and refreshing. One reason I choose to care for myself well is so I can enjoy myself well as I continue to grow well--which I think is mindful and respectful concerning growth with a potential future partner, or romantic interest. If you're looking for a book about sexual development and health, I highly recommend Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price (which is full of references to other expert and professional sources).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Karma of Brown Folk

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I enjoy learning about anthropological-cultural progressions (which I find the text to be informative of, respectively). I'm glad to be in connection with individuals of varying backgrounds willing to converse respectfully on varying topics. During a meeting at work, I express an interest in one of the topic options concerning the "Model Minority Myth." After conversations ensue around the topic, one of my colleagues recommends The Karma of Brown Folk by Vijay Prashad. I write the name of the book down, and I'm glad I decide to read the book. The text covers aspects of Asians and South Asians (Desi) in relation to individuals of the African diaspora as well as to cultural progress as Asians and South Asians (Desi) in connection to freedom, economy, equality, identity, multiculturalism, racialness, socialness, and solidarity ranging from historical roots of about the past two centuries abroad as well as in America.


Ultimately, the text leads to a point of cheering, and encouraging solidarity. While reading the text, I ponder of scenes in a film, The Rainbow (1989), concerning ideas of war, the way some view parts of life as a game in a way or so that is far more real to others--far more, affecting--present. Nurturing is a part of every culture, a responsibility of each human, whether self-nurturing, or nurturing another. I hope nurturing tends toward good, the betterment of humanity overall, from each individual of and through proper nurturing. 


In the film House Bunny (2008), there's a scene containing a point about not knowing about Aztec culture though having fun with an experience of an aspect of the Aztec culture in a celebratory form (which I think is actually a nod of respect in a tasteful way--especially in a comedy) some may find fun, honorable, offensive, be opinionless, etc. At the beginning of the Aztec party scenes, I cautiously think about social points that may be problematic concerning the party though I don't assume anything, the party looks like it's a success. I do not know any details concerning the proceeds of the film. Yet, in a situation no one is being disrespectful and/or making a profit from a different culture while crediting a particular culture at an event, open to any, from an aspect of a culture, with invitations out to members of all ethnic groups, is it problematic?


Will Critical Race Theorists be in proper spaces to properly guide students concerning anthropological-cultural relations? Will individuals be able to civilly communicate beyond cultural economic-political understandings toward resolves benefitial toward future generations without bias? Individuals may be doing so already. Still, nurturing properly is lifelong. Realistically, there are a lot of individuals that are like the bus driver that kicks the trouble making kids off the bus in The Long Walk Home (1990). It's nice to get to one's destination(s) without any problems. It's the responsibility of each individual to check individuals nearest first about the potentially problematic as well as the good especially in tandem with social relations (which do not just concern race). If there's no one near to properly nurture, one must be willing to learn, and listen-- self-responsiblity, and self-nurturing are very important: both need proper tending to be done well.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


During a visit to my Barber for a Taper, as per usual, we enter a discussion about human diasporas and histories, apart and interconnecting. In our discussion, a topic of perceptions of bodies of individuals of African descent arises in relation to a book my barber is imbibing via Audible (mayhap reading as well), Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia by Sabrina Strings. As our conversation veers toward romantic realms of perceptions of bodies, I decide I'll read the text for myself.

     The text offers histories of developing pseudo sciences, propaganda -- social standards/standardizing -- particularly concerning women broadly (though specifically honing in on culturing idealogies of beauty pedestaling Anglo-Saxon-Americans/parameters/characteristics of bodies) through about five centuries (with rootings and references from further back). I find the book informs modernity that a lot more accurate research without bias is necessary concerning better supporting developing health data in relation to weight for varying types of bodies.

     In tandem with physical characteristics of women I find attractive, and developing understandings of conversations concerning bodies via histories, modernity -- I understand, tastes differ. Aside from choosing to have a respect for conversations and understandings about race and bodies, for me, personally -- especially romantically, concerning bodies, I have strong inclinations toward athletic women that care about their well being (ideally overall), and find me attractive in a very similar regard as well. She can be of any ethnicity! 

      Growing up with a mom that has a nice physique and takes care of herself for so long so well is a great reason for my strong inclinations toward that which I find attractive physically. In 2017, I remember my mom walking through my room topless, at almost seventy, with an upper body that looks really good. She has a strong body. She takes care of herself. I don't judge or shun one because of one's body type. There are so many different types of people that find different types of bodies very attractive. I think Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia is a great resource for individuals seeking to learn more about parameters of data and health in tandem with bodies and media via a historical perspective.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Overstory: A Novel

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers is a fictional collection of stories about the importance of stories, purposeful vs. nonpurposeful ongoings of humans, and a wonderful homage to human nature in relation to nature overall with intricate deep details of curiosity, discovery, and truth. There are a lot of references in the text which I think help move the stories along well. I think the writing is really good though I find myself reading this text very slowly due to the nature of the content. I find the text to be overall important and relevant though not gripping (mainly because of the constant switching between stories which are vastly different though interconnecting, then the extreme intertwining emphasis on climate change -- mainly trees, which I like though I feel detracts from the stories though cleverly intentionally very well set for completion of the overall points of the text). I'm glad to be done reading the text especially since it is the second of two recommendations I remember telling someone I'll read (the first being Empire of the Summer Moon).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Richest Man in Babylon

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason is a book about becoming wealthy in general though from impoverishment through financial efficiency: spending less, saving, and investing well -- to say the least. The book advises many of the same lessons though through different situations in each chapter, all of which connect to ideals and practices of the richest man in Babylon, Arkad. I find the context to be financially relevant, simple, and useful. After completing equations from my own financial history, I realize one may have tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars or more within a span of thirty years by simply paying one's self a monthly wage above nintey dollars and saving that which one pays one's self-- for thirty years. The text offers insightful financial bits which cover a lot of basic financial bases. If I ever share a child or children, I realize I can set the child or children up to have a good amount of money at thirty. Imagine being thirty, a few years out of college, mature, a bit in debt, working an alright job, then receiving thirty thousand or more dollars: for a mature person, that can be life changing -- just as the simple financial advice in the text. I think The Richest Man in Babylon is worth reading.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Collected Oscar Wilde

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Collected Oscar Wilde offers select pieces from the span of Oscar Wilde's writing career. In graduate school, I remember having a crush on a peculiar openly bisexual girl quick to boisterously reference Oscar Wilde of whose works I recall reading very little. So, while perusing Barnes and Noble, I buy the book (I'm glad that I'm finally done reading all the books I purchase on that visit). I really like the organization of the collection. Here are pieces I really enjoy (for varying reasons) and recommend: The Portrait of Mr. W.H. (culturally important piece containing very interesting points concerning the developments of gender/masculinity/feminity in societies branching from societal standards/mentalities in relation to art mediums/media), Lord Arthur Savile's Crime, The Model Millionaire, The Canterville Ghost, The Young King, The Fisherman and His Soul, The Remarkable Rocket, "The Critic as Artist, Part I," "The Critic as Artist, Part II," "The Soul of Man under Socialism," and The Importance of Being Earnest. Yet, I enjoy reading the entirety of the selection and find Oscar Wilde's writing on aspects of theater to be quite insightful.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Mariel of Redwall

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


During my elementary school years, I remember walking by a Hallmark Gold Crown in Livingston Mall with my mother during the holidays and seeing Martin the Warrior by Brian Jacques on a book display in front of the store. Being an avid reader, I remember finding so much delight selecting the book. Even thinking on the memory brings me to a different sense of joy. After my mother purchases the book for me, I become a fan of the Redwall series. So, finding Mariel of Redwall in one of the library/local book exchange posts (at various locations in Long Beach-- some, if not all, in relation to LittleFreeLibrary.org), is a pleasing surprise for me. The level of elation I find from reading a Redwall book is explicably tearing, personally, and I find these texts quite enjoyable to read. Mariel of Redwall is a fictional story of a mousemaiden warrior that escapes the grips of Garbool the Searat King to find herself on a path of recovery and redemption with her new friends of Redwall and Salamandastron to defeat evil. I think Brian Jacques's Redwall series is a great stepping stone for children looking to read more arduous books with a literary maturity. Brian Jacques implements varying styles of literary culture into the Redwall stories which I find makes reading books from the Redwall series (concerning my reading history of the texts in the series so far) all the more enjoyable. I've yet to read all of them.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis is the sequel to Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant To Be (a bundle purchase from a time ago -- two books for about the price of one). The second book feels like a heavy recap of the first book though I don't find it as amusing. The second book feels more direct and gung ho about its intentions. I feel like the core of the text leads to and from the chapter, "Planning," which I think is the book's most pertinent chapter. As with any advice/self-help type book, I think it's important to keep an open-aware-deliberating ear/mind.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Life of Pi

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Life of Pi by Yann Martel is a poetic, touching, and witty fictional piece about a writer meeting with the sole survivor of a shipwreck and the eventual telling of the sole survivor's journey from before and after the shipwreck. During a discussion about the film adaptation of Life of Pi, I recall a bit of shock at my lackluster response about the film (though admittingly speaking from the perspective of watching the film while providing amazing customer service for gym patrons sometime in 2017). So, I decide to read the book and re-watch the film. After reading the book, I don't think any better of the film, but, I am glad about reading the text.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Horatio Alger Jr., Collection Novels

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

I remember conversing with a father and his son nearly four years ago about life. Near the end of our conversation, the father is aghast and has somewhat of a brain fart sigh-uttering the name Horatio Alger. I come to find Horatio Alger Jr. is an author. The Horatio Alger Jr., Collection Novels consists of five stories: "Grit," "Luck and Pluck," "Ragged Dick," "The Store Boy," and "In Search of Treasure." I enjoy every single one of these stories about character and integrity. These tales are quite fitting for more than Americans alone. Even so, Horatio Alger Jr. defines what an ideal American is, what the American ideal is to be, through the heroes of these stories.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

After reading about a quarter into Get Out of Your Own Way: A Skeptic's Guide to Growth and Fulfillment by Dave Hollis, I decide to read Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis and watch her documentary Made for More. She mentions her target audience being women though I find points in her messages capable of being relevant for any human. After reading the entirety of the text, I find a few of her points can use a little more context or else can potentially come off as seemingly contradictory. Rachel Hollis uses experiences from her life to encourage women to make choices toward living their best possible lives.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Get Out of Your Own Way

Hello,

I hope all is progressing well.

I’m heading out of the video game section of Walmart and find Get Out of Your Own Way by Dave Hollis on top of a stand at the exit of the video game section. We’re making eye contact. Why is this the only book there? I remind myself I’m already reading a book. I pick up the book, randomly open to a page near the end of the book, read a random portion of a paragraph (which so happens to be) of the only theme (which I come to find out is really in only that area of the book as a central topic for a bit with a little indirect sprinkle here and there in other parts of the text) immediately relevant to me throughout the entire book, and I buy the book. It’s a decent self-help book and I think it’s good to read self-help books from time to time (especially since I tend to read a variety of texts) with a grain of salt to a fresh-open-wound. Dave Hollis shares experiences from his life to advise and encourage readers toward decisions that are not community and self-sabotaging. I think the book may serve couples well too. Day-to-day, between varying conversations with varying individuals, and varying duties, I find Get Out of Your Own Way has points that people may benefit from learning and applying. Yet, as with any self-help text, one must be actively helping one's self. If you’re really into self-help books across the board (mind, body, soul relationships, etc.), this might not be the most enlightening read for you (which Dave Hollis notes near the beginning of the text). On another note, the book offers references to other developmental sources for one seeking to explore more contexts for self-improvement.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

The Communist Manifesto and Other Writings

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The excuse of a dog eating one's homework is believable to me now and I'm glad about it. The Communist Manifesto is a pamphlet. I order a copy via Amazon. My former neighbor's dog shreds the delivery. I go to Barnes and Noble then find The Communist Manifesto and Other Writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. If not for the occurrence with the dog, I might not have come to encounter one of the most important historical documents I've come to read to date, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, which digs into the economical-governmental-political-societal landscape of France in the 19th century with a focus on class and revolutions in the middle of the 19th century. After reading the text, I've a few affirmations to share:

1.) One does not have time to not create, discover, and fulfill one's purpose(s).

2.) One must develop and learn wholesome-positive-unimpeding senses of life, living.

3.) The understanding of genres in different fields is important.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writers

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writers by Dr. Irwin R. Blacker is very insightful especially for someone with only an inkling of screenwriting between the craft and business. The guide is a good reference and contribution to making one aware of parameters of screenwriting. I'm glad about reading the text. I observe films with a much better understanding now.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The 10 Laws of Trust

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

I learn about Joel Peterson and David A. Kaplan's text, The 10 Laws of Trust, via Yahoo Finance (as I'm scrolling through Twitter for Business News). After listening/watching the interview clip, I decide to add the text to my reading list (in September). Ultimately, the text is an attempt to build and safeguard high levels of trust in an organization. The text flows from aspects of some of Joel Peterson's experiences in his life which contribute to the developmental points in the text. I feel as though the text is especially for use as an organizational assessment-focal tool though one may find interesting insights reading the text alone. I think the text offers decent points to consider and deliberate (beyond the questions set forth within the book).

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne     

Heart of Darkness and Selected Short Fiction

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Heart of Darkness and Selected Short Fiction consists of "Heart of Darkness," "Youth," "Amy Foster," and "The Secret Sharer." I find each of these short stories to be profound and important. These contexts are relevant on a universal level. Each short story examines coinciding gamuts of internal and external worlds in a brief grand balance of immense depth.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Even the Stars Look Lonesome

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Even the Stars Look Lonesome by Maya Angelou is a pleasant-surprising read. The context is an aware appreciation of aging, being, being with art, being a woman, being of African descent, being an African woman and being of value as a person in connection with all that contributes well to their being and that which they choose to contribute from and to their being. I appreciate her points: in particular, I appreciate her points about aging, sexuality and sensuality: I think it's important for woman to talk about these topics and for men to hear women talk about these topics (especially since there are so many different people with different perspectives concerning these topics).

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

P.S. I Wanna Know by Joe

Great Sex for Life by Linda Sonntag

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Great Sex for Life by Linda Sonntag is a decent book (despite the few grammatical errors). The book is dated. Yet, the information relevantly contributes as modern texts concerning sexual processes. I found this book at a garage sale and there are really good points in the text. I like reading information of this nature from time to time (even if some of the information stands as refreshers): there's a lot one may learn to have a thriving intimate relationship and/or contribute very well toward an intimate relationship.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

P.S. This book contains nudity.

Rin, Tongue and Dorner

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Rin, Tongue and Dorner by Rich Shapero is a book about an extreme fire fetish intertwining with lust, madness, and passion. I received this book for free at the L.A. Times Book Festival. Do people entering new relationships from previous relationships have to endure so much? What are the underlying elements of a psyche transitioning pleasures with one person to share with another? I think Rich Shapero presents many psychoanalytical ideas that may be further honed in the context.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old Volumes 2-4

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Jataka Tales concern stories of Gautama Buddha's previous lives. I received these volumes of the Jataka tales for free at the L.A. Times Book Festival. Personally, I find many of these tales, meant to encourage one to be mindful and live a good life according to a particular order, as comical in getting their points across. These stories are available for free: I think some of them are as interesting to read as some of Aesop's Fables and some of Grimms' Fairy Tales.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

P.S. I like having physical copies of text(s). Clicking the link will lead to Bing search results leading to the Jataka tales. It's not hard to find the Jataka Tales online. Happy reading!

The Rhythm of My Life: Tuning into the Rocky Rhythms of Fire

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Rhythm of My Life: Tuning into the Rocky Rhythms of Fire by Yvon Milien is one of a few free books I got at the LA Times Book Festival. Essentially, it's about Yvon Milien's romantic life and spiritual journey (which, oddly enough, always engages him about his romantic life). A few (of so many) serious questions I like to raise concerning marriage (really relationships) are: 1.) What securities are in marriage that are not already in a serious bond? 2.) What are we trying to do together in the long term of life? 3.) Are you cool with you? Actually, I might uncover more of these questions with every book I read concerning romance and relationships. On another note, every time I read the title, "The Rhythm of the Night" by Corona starts playing in my head.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Initially, I find Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett resonating with "Who's on First," by Abbott and Costello (which is, interestingly enough, accredited to "Who's the Boss," an earlier comedic reference, and years of further development). Yet, as I continue to read, I discover a dark-honest satire about the world (as much as is given of it) in which these characters live that reveals the importance of purpose. Waiting for Godot jostles living, meaning in living, information, and meaning in information. Reading this text after Atlas Shrugged really makes me think more about why and how one is where and when one is with the future ahead. This text is not as dense as Atlas Shrugged but sends an important message about doing in and with one's life: one should not let their life fall in folly or wasting; one should find or make a reason to live their life or else one is left to answer, what is living at all? Where does one go from there if not with a decision, guidance, or the will?

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Jane Austen: Four Classic Novels

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Reading Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion is enjoyable and exhausting. I bought Jane Austen: Four Classic Novels to ensure I read the stories in the collection though I did not re-read Pride and Prejudice (I'm sure I read it). I find Jane Austen's writing to be exquisite in its choice genre: I like the way her writing engages particulars of social realms (of her stories) and the routes of her descriptions are as entertaining as gripping (at least to me). I'm glad to be done with reading these particular stories and am ready to engage other texts now.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Emissary

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

The Emissary by Yoko Tawada and translated by Margaret Mitsutani is a great fusion of speckles from Japan's history debating a developing future in a fictional hypothetical world questioning design and order of an overarching world through omniscient lenses of an inner world. I find The Emissary to be pointedly descriptive, buoyant, and as entertaining as tragic. The text blatantly though intricately displays beauty and joy as well as forcefully engages secure insecurities to draw appreciation in life. 

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Laws of the Sun

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Laws of the Sun by Ryuho Okawa initially makes me laugh (in a good way). The way the text portrays Buddhist beliefs in accordance with its correlations makes me more appreciative about active routes available for people to pursue creating a better world as well as to become better acting people. It's important to be cautious reading texts as such though I think one may find interesting points throughout these types of texts that are useful in assessing how one might better proceed with living their life.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Black Poets

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Black Poets is an anthology of Black American poetry edited by Dudley Randall. All-in-all the text is profound. I read so many varying poems by some persons I have never even heard of that are not only potent--but timeless, of which I am very grateful to have come to encounter through The Black Poets.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Milk and Honey

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur makes a lot more sense after reading the foreword. As much as these poems are of women, they are very relatable to men. I think Milk and Honey's extrospection and introspection offers more insight concerning women (really anyone relating to the experiences in the text).

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

Yuval Noah Harari writes cleverly about the developing human condition in Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. As much as the text discusses historical developments with importance, Yuval Noah Harari greatly ensures to emphasize the eternally-pervasive impact of imaginations working in accordance with the ambiguity of historical developments. I find the text to be an enjoyable-insightful read.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Women Who Run With the Wolves

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estés is an enjoyably insightful read of the developmental human psyche (don't let the title dismay you from reading the text). As I'm walking out of a library elevator reading, a woman asks me about the book, I tell her the title and admit to reading the book to better understand women and how to improve my relations with women (though every person is a person with their own individuality). Clarissa Pinkola Estés emphasizes the value of storytelling as an assistance to living through Women Who Run With the Wolves in an in-depth, entertaining-informing manner.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness concerns racial systematic relations. Michelle Alexander observes and opines on the effects of social developments in (primarily) American societies. After a discussion with my co-workers, I bought the book to better understand their perspectives. Still, I notice headway in human societies, in particular American societies, and I think continually developing intellectual pragmatism will prevail in bringing about greater-diverse-equal communities globally, let alone in the United States of America. The book is informative and definitely useful for its purpose in assisting conversation on the presented matters.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

In Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society Jared Diamond assesses post-Pleistocene human progressions. The text is very enlightening. Reading Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society in observation with modernity really makes me interrogate the decisions that people make especially when (seemingly) lacking (unless regardless of or in spite of) knowledge about human developments in history. It's definitely worth reading and may really assist one's sociological understandings.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm by Nancy Farmer is a comical story which I am able to envision in comic book form. There is a steadily moving plot within a realm of creative lore heavily set about Zimbabwe. The book is a simple read though has many details. The Glossary and Appendix assist readers navigating the text. The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm is an enjoyable-relaxing fiction: it's a casual carry along.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

     The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve by Edward Griffin is a very informative and insightful text concerning the development of the Federal Reserve System. In a very roundabout-informative-simple way, Edward Griffin presents the processes historically that culminate as the functions proving the Federal Reserve System as well as other facets of developing society affecting the present day and potentially future days. Edward Griffin seeks to resolve financial-social-political matters that seem to plague the entirety of the developing world that is experiencing any facets of the processes culminating into the functions proving the Federal Reserve System. The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve by Edward Griffin is a detailed-simple-thick read which requires careful attention especially because Edward Griffin doesn’t repeat or re-emphasize a lot of key points as much as he does others to maintain focus on the primary purposes of his text.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

The Business of the 21st Century

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

     The Business of the 21st Century by Robert T. Kyosaki has come to me by accident, an incident of work. Robert Kiyosaki mentions The Business of the 21st Century as a re-emphasis of his messages from Rich Dad Poor Dad with additional contributions that may further assist individuals in the 21st century. The Business of the 21st Century is a quick and simple read. 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Save Yourself!

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

     Save Yourself! by Robert Gilbreath is a very encouraging and enlightening piece (targeting white collar workers with information relevant to entrepreneurs concerning developing elements of one’s self in an ever changing world). This text is very relevant, and, as I am writing about it— I’m having a strong urge to re-read the text. As with all texts, read with a cautious-deliberating-open-mind (especially advising-self-help texts-- with so much readily available information, one must move forward with the information best leading them toward their next step, their next goal). The organization of the text makes reading very simple.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

 

War and Peace

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

     War and Peace has been a very enjoyable read. Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (A.K.A. Leo Tolstoy) writes a rigorous story concerning many different forms of relationships between/within particular areas of societies during a particular war era. War and Peace is a very intriguing story requiring (as I think any story of such depth does) one's patience and willingness to understand the various philosophical and theoretical observations in tandem with all the other working aspects of the story.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Passion for Excellence

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

     A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin is a comprehensive advisory and analysis piece for individuals seeking to improve in the worlds of their being. The premise engages manners that may consistently assist successes of businesses and individuals. A Passion for Excellence is for individuals willing to thrive in the worlds of their being. The information is priceless.

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

 

P.S. Improving learning and improving practicing may greatly assist in garnering successes.

Dreamcatcher

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.


     Stephen King's Dreamcatcher is a psychological thriller! Dreamcatcher is descriptive, raw, and unforgiving. Honestly, I think Stephen King tries appeasing certain processes in the story throughout and at the end of the story (except I don't think there are any fair ways to--well, you have to read the story for yourself and decide for yourself). As a creative, I'm appreciative of the extent Dreamcatcher covers which helps me understand working elements of the genre better. I find the implementation of Poetry throughout the novel to be appealing and effective.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Hundred-Year House

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

     The Hundred-Year House is a very Poetic Novel. After learning of Rebecca Makai's outstanding efforts as a successful short story writer: I've come to find no surprise in the creative processes pulling the text together. She does a great job of engaging and disengaging the audience leading up to key points in her story. Rebecca Makai draws on a lot of different creative writing angles to create a full story.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Five)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Five) by Kintetsu Yamada surrounds transitional points of Asako and Natori's relationship: mentorship in relation to obtaining a living space together, considerations of work schedules while living together (both work in the same company though in departments with different busy times i.e. Asako works in Accounting, a department that becomes very busy during the end of the fiscal year which is nigh for the company in the text), pacing in a relationship especially after her dad brings up a curious question of marriage (which Asako proceeds to answer in accordance with her feelings), considerations of a relationship/marriage (Asako's parents are in a marriage of 26 years, a subtle though heavy point set in the manga), meeting family members, and mindfulness in a relationship (both really like each other though are communicating honestly between each other to grow at a respectful pace together). I like volume five though there is minimal fan service.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Five)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Five) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is the last book of the series (confirming as of 9/11/2022). Renta and Saki make an agreement, and the manga has a happy ending. There is plenty of fan service. I feel like volume five is mainly for fan service, and outcomes rounding out the series. One aspect of sex that does not come up in the series is safe sex which I find peculiar since the series's core topics are relatively sexual. All in all, I enjoy the series particularly the illustrations in volume five.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Four)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Four) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) has a lot of fan service, more aggressively-sexual themes are present, and Succubi culture is more present in the story than in prior volumes. As Renta and Saki continue exploring sexually, both discover a lot more of each other, together and personally. Otherwise, the manga focuses on introducing characters, giving faces to names and plot points, and gives a clearer picture of Succubi life from a more domineering-dominatrix (though in non-demeaning sexual ways, the collection so far only has nice Succubi) lenses (though generally as well).  


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


On a bus, in a discussion about life, an individual recommends Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, I find myself preparing to order the book near immediately after the individual gets off the bus. Normally, if a person asks me to recommend a book I recommend Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill first (which I think is sound for anyone with ambition) though I find Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon, a more scientific-wholesome approach to fulfillment in life, long term (life-term, if you will), more sensible as a first recommendation now (though both texts I mention in this sentence complement each other well). Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon magnifies a human being in tandem with meditative practices as well as scientific data to help one guide oneself holistically. Personally, I like the text, and I find the text defines well aspects of becoming an aware-intentional-wholesome individual evidentially.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Sweat and Soap (Volume Three)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Three) by Kintetsu Yamada focuses on Asako and Natori's relationship becoming more visible and intimate. More so than volume one and volume two, communication takes center stage, a central theme in connection with situating and normalizing parameters of/for a/ comfortable relationship(s). Volume three is very soft core and the fan service is very minimal though appealing concept wise especially in respect to varying settings. The translation notes at the end of the manga as well as bonus scenes and tidbits help round the story.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Two)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Two) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is so good, sexy from the first page. Renta and Saki advance their relationship. Saki has needs she vocalizes, and Renta responds accordingly well! As a person really into safe sex (to the extent of ensuring STD/AIDS/HIV testing results from a consensual partner before penis in vagina sex, Fellatio, and/or any sexual activity that makes sense to have testing prior), I'm appreciating the innocent virgin play (you don't have to be a virgin for the sexual practices in the manga though). The story is getting hotter especially because Succubi have different dietary—health—needs, and there might be a new Succubus in the story! 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Ulysses: The Complete and Unabridged Text, as Corrected and Reset in 1961

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Ulysses by James Joyce is a text I come across in 2019 while helping one of my brothers pack to move. I find the text fantastically ecclesiastical, reverent to experience and individuality comically without delay or perturbance in writing as though James Joyce is freewriting with a lot in mind. The text is an excellent showcase of lyricism and poetic writing technique(s). The humour can be a bit like a crude public/private high school's students' group chat though sophisticatingly clever. I feel like James Joyce intends for me to learn about all worlds, particularly ideologically, intersecting his experiences, Dublin, and Ireland through his biblical-genealogical-parodical splay of critiquing—exploring—satiric, storytelling. As I delve into Ulysses, the more I find I am a part of an immense journey of language tumbling beyond with past and present, grappling—grasping—imagining a future, change. Before the very last section of the book, quite an interesting way to end the text perspective wise in connection with everything prior in the text, to me, I find myself acknowledging Ecclesiastes 3 as the perfect companion chapter for the entire book. All in all, I advise reading Ulysses as a collection of parts to dissect and analyze since the text offers so much to ponder.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume One)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well. 


While perusing manga in Barnes and Noble, my curiosity peaks at the title of one manga, Sweat and Soap, by Kintetsu Yamada, and I laugh after reading the blurb in the back of the manga. Scent can be a measure of attraction. I like the way Asako, the woman struggling with her perspiration and scent personally, interacts with Natori, the man that appreciates her scent. The manga so far covers interesting topics about romance: fetishes, attention one appreciates/wants and attention one doesn't appreciate/want (on bases of who and why), passions, coworkers dating, communication, scent, attraction, shopping for a bra, and sex amongst other points. I'm glad to be reading a physical manga, let alone a manga in general, again after so many years without doing so, and I'm likely going to read at least one volume a month until complete with the Sweat and Soap series. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith by Anne Lamott, a gift from an individual from Kansas I meet on a beach, is an interesting spiritual journey through the author's life toward becoming a more spiritual individual. The author shares perspectives therapeutically throughout the text; the text shows the author's honest admittances, acceptances, acknowledgements, and resolves of personal problems toward a better life, personally and generally. I like the text. No one really knows what another is going through, and I have a respect for completely fulfilling processes of taking personal responsibility of/for one's life, then moving toward a better life, as best as one may, necessarily. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sexual Soulmates: The Six Essentials for Connected Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sexual Soulmates: The Six Essentials for Connected Sex by Susan Bratton is a text sharing approaches to intimacy that may help enliven, enhance, sustain, and/or revive one's sexualness/relationship toward a healthier sexual life—intimate parameters. I learn of Susan Bratton through a good podcast episode of 2 Squirrels In A Sock (as a healthy single heterosexual individual, unintentionally seemingly celibate at the time of this posting, that tends toward constantly self-improving, it's nice hearing women talk joyfully about sex in a fun-healthy way, makes the world seem rounder, makes me feel better inside knowing women that like—and are taking responsibility toward—good healthy sexual relationships are alive). I mindfully-unselfishly acknowledge myself, my responsibilities—my life. Hearing Susan Bratton acknowledging her reality, then choosing to learn, to make a change for better—instead of blaming, trying to control a situation to be right in a way that may only make the relationship worse—already being on the brink of divorce—she makes her way toward a better-happier reality. Good communication and good intimacy are of processes that can benefit each other. Not every relationship is worth fighting for, sometimes a relationship just has to end, and parting ways is best. Even so, I like the points in the text; I think Susan Bratton offers advice, in the text and podcast episode, worth heeding.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Tao Te Ching: The Book of the Way

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I hope all is progressing well.


Tao Te Ching: The Book of the Way by Lao Tzu (a version by Sam Torode on the basis of a translation by Dwight Goddard) is a moralistic-philosophical guide via the ways of Tao toward establishing a stabler society as well as stabler senses of being. The text of meditations is in a form of a chapter book of poetry. There are a lot of lines and pieces that stand out. Here are some poems from the text I recommend: "Immateriality," "Knowing," "Not Knowing," & "Sharp Tools." At the end of the text are excerpts of The Manual: A Philosopher's Guide to Life by Epictetus which are enlightening, in a different philosophical stylistic form than the Tao Te Ching: The Book of the Way, though both offer important interesting points to ponder.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Creative Gene

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I hope all is progressing well.


I remember my oldest brother parking his car backward (front of the vehicle facing opposing traffic) on a one way street at night, us getting out of the car, walking to the trunk in a drizzle, him opening the nearly empty trunk then retrieving a bag to hand me with a vocal happy birthday, and me glad about having a birthday present, a Playstation game, Metal Gear Solid, my christening moment into the series.


Aside from my attraction to Naomi Hunter (especially since she looks like Nina/Anna Williams from Tekken—a resemblance of approachable, cool, intelligent, pretty, toughness—), Mei Ling, Nastasha Romanenko (mainly her voice), Metal Gear Solid (One) is so well put together between a phenomenal story, phenomenal gameplay, and voice acting. Metal Gear Solid (One) is a legendary stamp in gaming history. 


After completing the game, I remember searching for Hideo Kojima online, finding a Wikipedia page with no picture (though I remember the words being enough), and, at the time with different aspirations of being a video game designer (which I may be in a different sense in the long run of life), I recall Hideo Kojima being the second person I look up after Nobuou Uematsu (besides an entity like Square Enix—just to acknowledge, show appreciation in a way, mainly by reading about them/any project(s)). I will always have an appreciation for Metal Gear games I've come to play. Presently, I don't play video games as much as I work creatively, read, research, write, or watch movies though I have an appreciation for a good video game which is sound cause all one really has in such a temporary life are artifacts and memories until death, everything else seems complementary. So, when I find out about The Creative Gene, I decide to read it.


The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima, translations by Nathan A. Collins, is a collection of publications from Hideo Kojima about his becoming and philosophy as a person and game designer. The book has creative, personal, and professional tidbits that combine as a message to creators and fans as well as a text that allows one to get a better idea of Hideo Kojima as a person as well as creator through his contextual relationship(s) with different forms of media. I like the text. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Mae Among the Stars

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I hope all is progressing well.


While about encouraging reading, I re-encounter two individuals which share with me books of their choosing for practical use in a culturally enrichening sense in a classroom. I'm glad about the chance to read both books; in reading order; the first book is Mae Among the Stars, writing by Roda Ahmed, illustrations by Stasia Burrington, and the second book is I Am Golden, writing by Eva Chen, illustrations by Sophie Diao. This review will focus on Mae Among the Stars. The text is about the becoming of Mae Jemison, the first African American woman astronaut into space. The text is very specific to Mae Jemison though proves valuable for any child/person that may face challenges along the way toward realizing and fulfilling personal-life goals/dreams. The illustrations are neat and depict the happenings of the story well. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle & Song (A Library of America Anthology)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I'm glad to be done reading African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle & Pain (A Library of America Anthology), a collection of pieces by various writers with Kevin Young as the Editor, after buying the text about one and a half years ago. I really enjoy reading across vernaculars of cultures—individuals. The text is split into sections which I think helps with organization on a timeline. The variety of styles is wonderful and scales very well with the writings. I think the title of the anthology doesn't encapsulate that which the text offers completely. Though one may be able to find more African American Poetry within the same span of 250 years, the selections complete the volume well. I enjoy reading the anthology, and, must note, a text of the sort, really amplifies the importance of literacy.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Books of Enoch: The Angels, The Watchers and The Nephilim: (With Extensive Commentary on the Three Books of Enoch, the Fallen Angels, the Calendar of Enoch, and Daniel's Prophecy)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Books of Enoch: The Angels, The Watchers and The Nephilim: (With Extensive Commentary on the Three Books of Enoch, the Fallen Angels, the Calendar of Enoch, and Daniel's Prophecy) by Dr. Joseph B. Lumpkin are midrash, pseudepigrapha, and explorations of aspects of biblical stories as well as spiritual realms through varying religious/spiritual understandings contextually (Apocryphan, Gnostic, Christian, Jewish—). I buy the text in a bundle pack with another book, There Were Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA (Earth Chronicles), by Zecharia Sitchin (which is altogether quite different). The first book of Enoch is more apocalyptic. The second book of Enoch is more prophetic. The third book of Enoch is more adventurous, the most enjoyable for me to read. All in all, the texts carry adventurous, apocalyptic, and prophetic substances though to different degrees, of entertainment, if you will, and make traditional biblical characters a lot more interesting (like, are there really plot twists in the entire Jesus story? What's up with Cain and Abel's sister?). After reading these texts, I find I am receiving a lot more answers of questions from my childhood about the linearity of religious stories in the Bible. The third book of Enoch is way too entertaining for church, particularly in a traditional sense. Overall, I'm glad about reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne 

Collected Fictions

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I hope all is progressing well.


I learn about Jorge Luis Borges through a good conversation about books with a woman that ghosts me within ten hours of promising to read pieces by the author with me. Alas, her actions have no basis on the way I read the book, as enduring as I remember the process being for reasonably extensive pieces.

Collected Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges, translated by Andrew Burley, is a collection of writing pieces from Jorge Luis Borges. Here are the pieces I find interesting and help with better understanding the collection overall: "Man on Pink Corner," "The End," "The Library of Babel," "Death and the Compass," "Three Versions of Judas," "The Immortal," "The Aleph," "The Yellow Rose," "The Witness," "Juan Muraña," "The Disk," "The Book of Sand," "Blue Tigers," "The Gospel According to Mark," and "Deutsches Requiem." In the Collected Fictions, Jorge Luis Borges constantly approaches clarifying the unclarifiable universe in a way that makes his writing more appealling. The author leaves no doubt about his being well-aware of stories as well as writing styles scaling decades, centuries, millenia—generations, in honorific senses, and prepares readers with inklings of information acknowledgins so, so as to, I think, better help the reader engage the pieces. There are some pieces that are more intellectual than others, more entertaining than others, more personal than others, more contemplative than others, and I think that adds to the variety in the author's consistency of styles which the author does not mind detailing. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

There Were Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


There Were Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA by Zecharia Sitchin is a speculative observance of archaeological, geological, and literary developments exploring toward discovering answers for questions about human genetic formation, history, and identity. I literally run into a couple of individuals one night having a discussion about anthropology and publishing. One of the individuals recommends the text which actually reminds me of another text I remember wanting to read nearly a decade ago due to my curiosity of Biblical proportions. Reading There Were Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA makes aspects of the Bible rounder which I find interesting since after an edit or translation, an ancient/historical text can be quite different than an original version of the ancient/historical text—a source text. All in all, I find the text to be an interesting walk through of an anthropological perspective.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us

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I hope all is progressing well.


After lightly searching online through a search engine for different types of fetishes that might exist, I discover Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us by Jesse Bering. I find the book is a very insightful text covering a wide scope of fetishes through lenses attempting to understand a human's mind around ideas in relation to sex. The text is not a list of fetishes though more rewarding in that it provides very accurate understandings with historical references about developments of humans in relation to sexual development. I find the language dense though placable because I feel I'll be able to better regard another even more so than I already do now. The author does not seem to be pushing a sexual agenda at all beyond researching toward understanding, and seems to be fighting for the protection of children overall. I like the text. I think the text is worth reading. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Four Loves

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I hope all is progressing well.


The Four Loves by C.S. Lewis is very intriguing to me because of ways I notice love developing. I find C.S. Lewis exacts upon exactness of different loves in an extremely insightful tome. Growing up with an appreciation and devoutness for God, in religious and spiritual senses, I find makes reading the text more understandable in its totality, personally, especially with my background of researching, in some regards practically, other branches of spirituality beyond Christianity. Even so, C.S. Lewis seems to organize the text in a way that seems to acknowledge not all reading the text may have an extensive-good-thorough religious and/or spiritual background. His points concerning religion and/or spirituality connect to the sorts (religion and/or spirituality) of his defining which I find reasonably sensible. Usually, when a person asks me to recommend them a book, I know which one I will always recommend first. After reading The Four Loves, I feel like I have another book I may have to recommend first depending on a person's current point as well as choice direction personally, in and of that person's life. This is one of the most eye opening books I've come to read in my life. Now, I have a far better understanding of the four loves: Storge (Affection), Eros (Romantic), Philia (Friendship), and Agape (Charity). I think everyone needs to read, and understand this text in its totality. I think The Four Loves is a text one may find useful for life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics

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I hope all is progressing well.


Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics contains ten books about conditions of/discussing conditions of being good, and happy. This version of the text is a translation by Robert C. Bartlett and Susan D. Collins which includes an interpretive essay of ideas in the books (at the end of the book, overall). I don’t feel the interpretive essay is a necessary read though may be beneficial for argumentative points (if in agreeance or disagreeance with the author(s) of the interpretive essay—if a person is seeking to discuss/write about topics in the text particularly in relation to the essay's coverage). I think Aristotle offers sound perspectives concerning parameters of being/defining good, and happiness. I think Aristotle is positing arguments well while not setting absolutes, seemingly regarding/respecting potential for a different/new perspective for contemplative purposes at the least. I find the text to be enjoyable though grueling. Alas, I am glad about reading the text. I think the text offers contemplative-insightful-relevant perspectives concerning human development in relation to parameters of ideas of good, and happiness.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction

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I hope all is progressing well.


Developments of academia's learning parameters interest me. In light of recent bills like H.B. No. 3979 (which seems to be protecting against extremist beliefs/behaviors that may be personal beyond curriculums which are inclusive of aspects of particular histories albeit not entire histories of particular histories (which may take a lot of time to include in a school day anyway)), I decide to learn more about Critical Race Theory. According to the "Glossary of Terms" in Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic, the definition of Critical Race Theory is, "Progressive legal movement that seeks to transform the relationship among race, racism, and power." There are many branches to Critical Race Theory; Critical Race Theorists and Theories can vary so much: From my analysis of the text, I find Critical Race Theory is about critically thinking and theorizing about anything to do with race for analysis, creative/practical purposes, and research. Even as there is a definition of race in the "Glossary of Terms," race seems to be ambiguous, there is seemingly a limitless pathway of inquiry concerning further developments of ideas concerning race.


The text is a scan of different theories of/and theorists that shows different ways Critical Race Theory can branch which seems to include perspectives of the authors. I think the text is a good introduction to Critical Race Theory broadly though if any seek/teach beyond the introduction, the class name will most likely need to have/be a very specific name (which I think is important so as to not misdefine and obscure Critical Race Theory as a whole (which I think falls more in line with available college/university courses/course naming practices beyond a broad-general sense of a topic of discourse/learning anyway)). I'm glad about reading the text, I have a much clearer understanding of Critical Race Theory now.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Talented Tenth

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I hope all is progressing well.


The Talented Tenth by W.E.B. DuBois is an insightful-instructional piece communicating needs for human development and the integral role proper education holds toward properly stimulating humans toward being aware whole individuals fully supporting positive-social developments from within (as humans) throughout (toward and within societies). I buy the text as a part of a learning process for research purposes. W.E.B. DuBois deliberates conditions of humanity with distinct though very inclusive lenses observing African-American developments in conjunction with educational and societal parameters — all of which I consider very important toward further recognizing particular roots so as to better create/improve educational as well as societal parameters for capable-good individuals willing to succeed.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo (Second Edition)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo (Second Edition) by Plato is a philosophical journey of Socrates from periods of his trial in Athens through his death. I buy the book as a part of a bundle suggestion on Amazon. Pure curiosity. The text explores the importance of culturing, death, justice, learning, life, meaning, nurturing, and infinite opportunities of a soul through finite forms as well as many other fusions of cultural-literary-mathematical-philosophical equations. I really enjoy reading the text: there are about thirty-five dialogues altogether. Even so, I find within the five dialogues much relevant wisdom. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Showa Anthology: Modern Japanese Short Stories (1929-1984)

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I hope all is progressing well.


The Showa Anthology: Modern Japanese Short Stories is a collection of stories by varying authors concerning developments of Japan's land, social, and ideological scapes in the twentieth century. I think the stories work well together offering geographical, social, and ideological perspectives concerning Japan and individuals of Japanese descent-- Japanese culture. I like the anthology overall, and I think all the stories in the anthology are worth reading. Here are a few specific stories from the anthology I recommend: "Mating" by Kajii Motojirō, "Les Joues en Feu" by Hori Tatsuo, "Magic Lantern" by Dazai Osamu, "Moon Gems" by Ishikawa Jun, "Bad Company" by Yasuoka Shōtarō, "Stars" by Kojima Nobuo, "Still Life" by Shōno Junzō, "With Maya" by Shimao Toshio, "Under the Shadow of Mt. Bandai" by Inoue Yasushi, "Mulberry Child" by Minakami Tsutomu, "One Arm" by Kawabata Yasunari, "The Day Before"  by Endō Shūsaku, "Friends" by Abe Akira, "Platonic Love" by Kanai Mieko, "The Clever Rain Tree"  by Ōe Kenzaburō, and "The Immortal" by Nakagami Kenji.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne



The Fountainhead

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I hope all is progressing well.


The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand is one of the most prolific texts I have come to read. This is an incredible-intricate story about becoming and being. I cry uncontrollably reading the last hundreds of pages. Both Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead are excellent-extraordinary-insightful masterpieces: I highly recommend both texts. Ayn Rand is one of the greatest-truest writers I've come to experience, literature-wise, of all time.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Crucible

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I hope all is progressing well.


The Crucible is a play by Arthur Miller about communities developing and branching from around Salem, Massachusetts that agitates ideas about belief(s), faith(s), community, equity, gender, religion(s), and sexuality circa 1692. I remember wanting to read the play after watching Molly's Game (2018 -- a film I recall enjoying) -- though the text seems somewhat familiar, as though a re-read. I find the play to be a very intellectual piece. Arthur Miller seems to be interrogating ideas of different sects of the church especially between Catholicism and Protestantism. All of the characters in the play are so good and well set. I find the text to be a very enjoyable read.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Goody Two-Shoes

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I hope all is progressing well.


Goody Two-Shoes by John Newbery is mainly about an orphan girl's developments into a prominent woman through education, good deeds, and helpful people. The book highlights benefits of living and pursuing a good life. As much as it seems like a book for children, the content seems mature. I don't know if there are different versions of the story. I recommend looking around for as near to the original copy as one can purchase. My copy looks like it's a put together rough draft though is clear enough to read, to me. Now, I better understand the term Goody-Two-Shoes and find it to be more honorable than disrespectful. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

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I hope all is progressing well.


Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne is one of two texts I recall telling two individuals I will read after their recommendations of the texts. The text is an in depth ironing of historical corrugations primarily concerning Comanches in relation to ideas of Manifest Destiny, western migrations (primarily about North America) in general, Indian tribal relations, advancing technologies, advancing economies, war -- geography, and aspects of Quanah's lineage as well as personal development amongst other points. I find the text to be insightful of historical-governmental-human relations especially of aspects of Native American culture beyond an elementary misunderstanding toward/of Thanksgiving (History.com -- Washington Post) in North America particularly between the span of the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. I find particular attention is necessary to follow the chronological management in the text since there is no distinct timeline of events as a companion to the text-- which I find overall, a splendid read.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

In graduate school, I remember a professor of one class and a student of another class, referencing James Joyce during a time of my inquiring interests of Irish stories, I'm glad to be done reading Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a masterful work of prose. This coming of age story of Stephen Dedalus as an individual of Irish descent, a student, a religious observer/practitioner (as a member of the Catholic sodality), a son, a lover, an artist, a philosopher, a human -- is intellectually stimulating! The language is insightful about ideas of nationalism, religion/religiosity, socialism, individualism, English and Irish sentiments, tradition, legacy, and free thinking vs. group thinking between different types of believers with differing beliefs. Dubliners is a collection of good short stories about varying individuals of varying circumstances around Dublin/Ireland. Overall, James Joyce seems to show a great awareness, respect, and reverence of Irish culture as well as a logical-respectful subversion toward establishing greater parameters of living and life without prejudice beyond apprehension. In these stories, James Joyce seems to be encouraging literally escaping toward living a greater fulfilling life as he appreciates though antagonizes Escapism as well as nostalgia very well. His writing style is unique (new to me concerning grammar and punctuation usage) and full of wit. Even so, I find these stories are very-very enjoyable.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Ultimate Guide to Orgasm for Women: How to Become Orgasmic for a Lifetime

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I hope all is progressing well.

One day I decide to look around an adult shop and find a few books with interesting titles, one of them being, The Ultimate Guide to Orgasm for Women: How to Become Orgasmic for a Lifetime by Mikaya Heart. The text is an exploration of sexuality pertaining to orgasms between facts, observations, and opinions. I think the text offers a lot of important points about orgasms, a lot of which I am encountering for the first time in such a light. I think the text offers a broadening perspective concerning sexuality in general, orgasms in particular, and offers a lot of references for further research as well as a questionnaire for further self-analyzation. I find the text to be enjoyable, insightful, and useful.

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne 

The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry, 1853--1955

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I hope all is progressing well.

The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry 1853--1955 by Andrew Gordon concerns the prewar, interwar, and postwar developments of cultural and employment systems within particular companies of the Heavy Industry in Japan between the middle of the 19th century and the middle  of the 20th century (a bit beyond the middle of the 20th century). The text delves into developments of relations between different types of workers nationally, and globally (part-time, full-time, temporary, managers, etc.) concerning wages, seniority, paternalism, unions, and skills. As much as the text focuses on developments of culture and labor relations in accordance with Japan -- Tokugawa society, the Meiji order -- there are stark connections, within these developments, to processes in accordance with government, industrialization, and nationalism branching from and within other nations. I am very glad about reading The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry 1853--1955. I find the text to be very insightful and relevant to understanding modern day labor relations.

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne 

The Old Man and the Sea

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I hope all is progressing well.

 

In a conversation about reading, someone refers me to The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. As I'm reading a few other books, I consider the text as a possible future read. The text doesn't come to mind again until I am watching a film, The Equalizer, which references the text many times with what some might consider spoilers and a bit of a book review by Robert McCall played by Denzel Washington. I decide to read the text sooner than later.

The Old Man and the Sea is about a fisherman, Santiago, fishing alone, with a lot of experience on the sea, that doesn't seem to be catching any fish. The text is like a reflection of Santiago's life, an appreciation and a longing for his youth, a different life, and a hope in a different lifestyle. Ernest Hemingway's illusive use of hope and skill through the old man's actively reflecting life is fascinating. I think the text is an appreciation of the human spirit -- human will -- human intelligence, deep, and enjoyable.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sons and Lovers

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I hope all is progressing well.

 

Walking into Barnes and Nobles, I spy tables full of books on sale. I peruse the books and select a reasonable collection to read. I'm more familiar with reading D.H. Lawrence's poetry than any other writing form from him. Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence is an exploration of life and relationships in an infinite expanse. The novel is poetically reflective in flow and balances between different tethering planes of a human's personal existence. D.H. Lawrence presents very valid points concerning relationships and the presence of life's abundance. Sons and Lovers is a fitting title and well-worth analyzing after reading the story as well as throughout. I appreciate Sons and Lovers and find the text overall to be astounding.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sexual Happiness for Women: A Practical Approach

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Sexual Happiness for Women: A Practical Approach is an insightful read. I think the text can be really useful for couples and can help an individual with seeking a suitable-ideal relationship. I'm glad about reading the text. Sexual Happiness for Women: A Practical Approach really engages important parameters of relationships and sexuality which can help anyone reading the text become more aware and grow.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths by Bernard Evslin is a collection of stories matching its self-explanatory title. Prior to reading the text, I'm not familiar with many of these tales hence the reason I'm glad about a conversation reminding me about this collection in my Google Play Books library which brings me to completing the reading. I find these Greek Myths to be laughable: I enjoy reading them. At the end of the book, there is a glossary of modern terms deriving from Greek Mythology which is a somewhat relevant-interesting appendix of tidbits.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Song of Fire and Ice: A Game of Thrones

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

A Game of Thrones is the first book of George R.R. Martin's series A Song of Fire and Ice. The book is about clans, families, tribes, and individuals vying to avenge, honor, live peaceably, rule, etc. according to life as is of their understanding in the realms of Westeros and Essos. I find the text to be an enjoyable fantastical read. Heads up: A Game of Thrones is very fleshy.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Common Sense and Other Writings

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Common Sense and Other Writings by Thomas Paine is a collection of pieces well set together encouraging and enlightening toward the improvement of societies: the collection begins with Thomas Paine's article, "African Slavery in America." From thence, Thomas Paine's collection purports facts and ideas revealing enslavement under the facility of corrupt aristocracies, monarchies, governments, and any benefiting-supporting-extending parts of societies in connection to the corruption of the aforementioned parties. There are many correlative aspects to modernity in Thomas Paine's contexts which makes the collection a more insightful-relevant read. Reading this collection reminds me that the United States of America is somewhat of a young country.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Art & Wonder: An Illustrated Anthology of Visionary Poetry

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Art & Wonder: An Illustrated Anthology of Visionary Poetry is an intriguing compilation of art and poetry selected by Kate Farrell. I like the format of the anthology which offers for a multifaceted appreciation. Here are some of the poems I appreciate: "The Child Is Introduced to the Cosmos at Birth" by an anonymous Omaha Indian, "The Song Turning Back Into Itself 7" by Al Young, "A Message from the Crane" by Pak Fu-Jin, "Sometimes" by Thomas McGrath, "Sailing to Byzantium" by William Butler Yeats, "Invisible Particles of Air" by Gustavo Adolf Bécquer, "Elevation" by Charles Baudelaire, "When, With You Asleep" by Juan Ramón Jiménez, "Sonnet XLIII" by William Shakespeare, "Emergence" by Robert Francis, "Day-Blind" by Chana Bloch, "An Altogether Different Language" by Anne Porter, " Vermeer" by Stephen Mitchell, "The Master" by Frederick Morgan, "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman, "Explosion" by Delmira Agustini, "The Secret Land" by Robert Graves, "The Paradise Within: Adam Speaks with the Angel" by John Milton (from Paradise Lost), and "However Far You Go" by Heraclitus (deep and exhilarating).

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Invisible Ink

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Invisible Ink by Brian McDonald is an insightful book about building stories. I received the book as a gift when I was helping one of my brothers pack up to move. I think it's a great addition for teaching about story telling as well as for one seeking to create stories (especially if one hasn't been through rigorous course work, practices, and/or experiential learning processes concerning stories). The real kicker for me is Brian McDonald's hysterical screenplay, White Face, at the end of Invisible Ink: I've never seen the short film, but, I will when reasonably possible.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Map: Collected and Last Poems

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Map is a collection of many poems written by Wisława Szymborska translated by Clare Cavanagh and Stanisław Barańczak. I actually set down a decent book of fiction to read this collection of poems which felt so necessary and good to read (the necessity to read Poetry I felt before the purchase, the good from the Poetry came while and after reading it). "In Broad Daylight," moved me in an alarming way; after reading the poem, I felt like how I might imagine both parties might feel in a situation where one person is shaking another person to ensure they're alive after a potentially disastrous situation and the person turns out to be so--alive. The poems in the collection vary well: here are a few other poems that stood out to me; "Map," "Hand," "At the Airport," "Confessions of a Reading Machine," "Identification," "The Old Professor," "List," "Return Baggage," "A Contribution to Statistics," "The Silence of Plants," and "The End and the Beginning."

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson is an arguably interesting read (as one may say of near any text). After being recommended the book, I was sitting on a chair in a corner near the entrance inside Barnes and Nobles reading: I turned my head, saw the book, and shook my head (I was reading Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand at the time). I got into a discussion about The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck again: I was not going to read it (because of other books) then I read an article online with an interesting headline and arguable perspective which I find to be an excerpt from the text at the end of the article--so, I bought it. Why? Just to read more of the arguable perspective. I liked three points in the text which I'll vaguely mention as to not spoil the processes of the text for any potential reader: Onoda, Values, and Death.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Medusa Enigma

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Medusa Enigma by Dr. Dino Panvini, M.D., is one of a few free books I got at the LA Times Book Festival. Dr. Panvini goes through a lot of drama getting into a really toxic relationship and chasing money. There's a lot more to the story concerning his experiences as a medical professional and his encouragement toward God. At the end of the story, I ask myself a few questions: 1.) What is he really happy about? 2.) What does the outcome mean for him now in comparison to before the drama? 3.) What has he learned from writing this story about himself?

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Seeds

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Seeds by Emilie K. Hill is a book of poetry I've come by through a community group. I may re-iterate this point time-and-time again: expression is important--necessary-- and is available through many channels for the betterment of human social interactions and understandings. "You" and "Junk" are poems that stand out to me: the narrator is filtering emotional, mental, physical and spiritual clutters to make sense of moving forward in sensible order embracing remnants of attachments as propulsion. 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Atlas Shrugged

Hi,

I hope all