top of page

I've got a treat for you, and I hope you love it (at least like it). I am writing! Yet, a lot of my writing is unavailable to the public sphere until going through publication processes! So, I am creating a FREE public story which YOU are able to read via Wattpad! Now, you can experience some more of my storytelling: http://my.w.tt/UiNb/4Do8PXvgkGFREE, enjoy!

Since I'm always reading: I'm adding books I'm done reading (from August 2017 on, with blurbs) in a list (which will be on Goodreads as well). Happy Reading!

Investing well in yourself is a smart idea. Now—investing smart is very important. I have an interest in stocks and Acorns is an investing avenue which helps invest some of my money well with smart investments. If you join with my link, you and I will receive five dollars ($5.00) in our Acorn accounts: https://www.acorns.com/invite/?code=4FHGXB! Let's reap the benefits together, enjoy!

The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy by Dr. Amie Harwick is a guide—even considering the title and an earlier mention of being a piece for heterosexual women though many women may benefit aside from heterosexual women—protracting to any seeking to be more knowledgeable about approaching sexual realms. When perusing old browser tabs to read articles of interest from a time ago, I find myself reviewing information, with an open mind looking to perhaps learn anew; in a Men's Health article, "The 4 steps to giving her multiple orgasms", I find Dr. Amie Harwick—a source of information in the article—has a book (The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy ) concerning a field of which I have a reasonably-strong interest in due to my choice progressions toward being a more mindful romantic-/life-partner. My reason for deciding to buy then read The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy by Dr. Amie Harwick is because of learning about Dr. Amie Harwick's fatal experience with domestic violence from her website.


The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy by Dr. Amie Harwick offers sound advice with relevant research to the point of her book's publication (though largely in connection with relevant available research in 2024). As always, good communication is necessary for a/ good-healthy-successful relation(s). In relation to multiple orgasms, I think, men may not only be long lasting though multiorgasmic (speaking from personal experience) (of which a refractory period is nonexistent): I don't know if perhaps a/ reason(s) may be in connection with psychology-mentality, biology-physical-well-being, a/ level(s) of connection(s)/progression(s) of arousal independently and/or interdependently, and/or otherwise. I think more research on men being multiorgasmic, may be necessary (to at least adjust future language about men and orgasms at large, if not already in process or done, which I think, helps expand and mature conversations at large about orgasms and sex). The text has a lot of pictures of nude forms (mainly buttocks and nipples) and has a lot of references/resources for one to approach concepts of contexts in the text more well-roundingly. 


I buy and read the eBook version of the text due to not finding an affordable, to me, physical copy. The eBook version offers direct links to website references. I'm always going to advocate for reading a/ physical book(s) due to long-term health benefits in connection with spatial development which work in connection with physical parameters. Even so, I find the following texts may assist one in further deliberating contexts of concepts within The New Sex Bible for Women: The Complete Guide to Sexual Self-Awareness and Intimacy by Dr. Amie Harwick: Great Sex for Life by Linda Sonntag, Sexual Happiness for Women: A Practical Approach by Maurice Yaffe and Elizabeth Fenwick, The Ultimate Guide to Orgasm for Women: How to Become Orgasmic for a Lifetime by Mikaya Heart, Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price, Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us by Jesse Bering, She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman by Ian Kerner, Sexual Soulmates: The Six Essentials for Connected Sex by Susan Bratton, The Vagina Book: An Owner's Manual for Taking Care of Your Down There by The Thinx Inc. Team, Dr. Jenn Conti, MD, and Daiana Ruiz (Illustrator), The Penis Book: A Doctor's Complete Guide to the Penis—From Size to Function and Everything in Between by Dr. Aaron Spitz, M.D., This is How You Vagina: All About Your Vajayjay and Why You Probably Shouldn't Call it That by Dr. Nicole E. Williams, M.D., Come As You Are (Revised and Updated): The Surprising New Science That Will Transform Your Sex Life by Dr. Emily Nagoski, Ph.D., The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina: Separating the Myth from the Medicine by Dr. Jen Gunter, M.D., Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom: Creating Physical and Emotional Health and Healing (Newly Updated and Revised 5th Edition) by Dr. Christiane Northrup, M.D., It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, A Man's Guide to Healthy Aging: Stay Smart, Strong, and Active (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by Edward H. Thompson, Jr., and Lenard W. Kaye (with contributions from contributors which receive credits at the end of the book), What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, The Joy of Sex by Dr. Alex Comfort, M.B., D.Sc., Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, The Heart of Tantric Sex by Diana Richardson, The Complete Kāma Sūtra: The First Unabridged Modern Translation of the Classic Indian Text (translation by Alain Daniēlou [inclusive of help from Kenneth Hurry]), Tantric Orgasm for Women by Diana Richardson, Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship by Dr. Stephen Snyder, M.D., Urban Tantra: Sacred Sex for the Twenty-First Century by Barbara Carrellas, Dr. Nita’s Crash Course for Women: Better Sex, Better Health, Better You by Dr. Nita Landry, MD, OB-GYN, The Girls' Guide to Growing Up Great: Changing Bodies, Periods, Relationships, Life Online by Sophie Elkan with Laura Chaisty and Dr. Maddy Podichetty as well as Illustrations by Flo Perry, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, and Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Steve Jobs

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson is a biography of Steve Jobs. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the text due to being curious about what the text might contain. When reading the book, I realize how much one may not know if one is not abreast of what a company may really be like and/or what culture may mean, especially in connection with a particular company (or any entity in connection with a company). The book shows perspectives of a progressing interdependent reality at large via perspectives branching from Silicon Valley (inclusive of explaining the beginning, the aggregation of entities to become popular as Silicon Valley). I learn a lot from reading the text beyond nuances of Steve Jobs's business/non-business relations, skill set(s), and temperament(s). Earlier in my life, I don't come across Apple as soon as I do a Dell/Gateway (computer package) and/or any video game console. On another side of existence, in a world of which Apple is a part, I'm more in tune with customization; learning one may build one's own computer suitable for one's purpose(s) especially with software separate from hardware— being better able to better attune a device to particular hardware, like a particulare video game may prove better with a patricular graphics card—is astounding, phenomenal. I recall encountering hacker culture through videogames (modifications of an Xbox and/or GameCube—or for a/ game(s) on one of those consoles). I remember a school of my attendance in 8th grade having a computer class, mainly for teaching typing, using Apple computers, and I remember not finding the OS user friendly (becoming familiar with a place to, literally start [via Windows] especially in an initial situation where one is on one's own, is quite different than starting up a computer and just trying to figure out what to do with it, especially if not familiar with a GUI and without guidance, like a teacher conducting a class). I remember appreciating having an iPod Mini (before it goes missing) and two iPod Touches (which I win through an online competition via CliffNotes)(one of which I share with one of my brothers, an engineer working on code for functionality with an OS component in connection with a device like an iPod Touch, at the time—and, the other eventually breaks down, to be fair, after a reasonable amount of use). Even so, I recall spending far more time with my PSP which, aside from the battery, is in very good shape more than a decade later. Even after receiving a MacBook as a gift going into college (which eventually breaks down after becoming somewhat like a public computer that I sell a few years later for parts), I begin to find an appreciation and use for software like iMovie and GarageBand in Graduate School; tools of the sort, so functional and readily available, with a device like a MacBook make a device more valuable, to me. I think the book may be a great contribution to well-rounding one's perspective of technological progress toward the latter 20th century, entering into the 21st century, and I think the book may assist one in being more aware of what potential of an entity may mean and what fulfilling potential of an entity may mean in connection to an interdependent reality at large. Ultimately, I find the text leaves one to consider, greatly, how one might want to contribute to the ever progressing interdependent reality at large of which all are in connection. I find the following texts may assist one in further deliberating contexts of concepts within Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson: Beyond the 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch, Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin, The Perfection Trap: Embracing the Power of Good Enough by Dr. Thomas Curran, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke, The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch, and The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The 80/20 Principle

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch is like a self-help type book guiding (through qualitative and quantitative research) one to practically apply a principle (the author progresses from Vilfredo Pareto's Cours d’économie politique) popular as the Pareto rule (or 80/20 rule) to myriad areas of life, empowering an entity toward a better interdependent reality at large. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the text due to a curiosity: what contexts might be in connection with the title? I find the text comically blunt guiding through careful analysis and thinking of the applicability of the 80/20 rule in translation through the author's theoretical-practical arguments for living through the 80/20 principle, insightfully coaching one toward a more agreeable choice future in connection with all that is, toward greater of what may be through one's self in connection with all that is, one's self in connection with an interdepent reality at large—advising only toward objective good of life. I find the following texts may prove valuable with further deliberating contexts of concepts within The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch: Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Dr. Matthew Walker, PhD, Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD, The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman, The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry 1853—1955 by Andrew Gordon, The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity by David Graeber and David Wengrow, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke, and Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Meditations

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Meditations by Marcus Aurelius (Translator: Martin Hammond) is like a collection of sentiments, journaling, if one will, of an emperor-philosopher, which enlighteningly guides acknowledging life's value(s), divinity, law(s), nature, the Universe (at large), and being all in connection with philosophy entwining an interdependent reality at large. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the text due to the text coming to my attention multiple times more recently (especially since thinking of Confessions by Augustine of Hippo, when attempting to recall from whence/where [thinking of a volume of Norton Anthology of World Literature] I remember reading Meditations by Marcus Aurelius though come to discover my current read to be my initial read of Meditations by Marcus Aurelius). I find Meditations by Marcus Aurelius to be of sound advice for one to appropriately-mindfully initiate life well (even if seemingly as quips for one to deliberate from a/ perspective[s] of an individual responsible for one's self as well as the betterment of a/ people). Additionally, I find the following texts may prove valuable to deliberate contexts of concepts within Meditations by Marcus Aurelius: Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, and How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Rose That Grew From Concrete

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Rose That Grew From Concrete by Tupac A. Shakur is a collection of poems of which he creates via a writing circle which he connects with through his relationship with Leila Steinberg (who provides more context of Tupac especially in connection with the writing circle in the beginning of the text via the Introduction). When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the book due to a curiosity of: what else might Tupac offer lyrically—poetically—philosophically—on paper (though a poem or so is quite musical, if not—at the least, rhythmic)(considering beyond what I really don't know about the artist, media and amplifications of media are quite different in the early 21st century than the late 20th century; culture and media antagonizing each other with culture and progress of amplification [methods] being variable factors which seemingly progress of culture always helping to regulate or re-equilibrize, all in connection with deep investments of a/ figure[s] broadcast particularly, affect similarly though differently in modernity—depending on a lot of factors). Tupac is a character/personality cross-generationally recognizable in popular culture, especially if in connection with Hip-Hop/Rap. With knowledge about intelligences in modernity, one may argue Tupac's death comes at a point of (about a particular age range) which the brain begins to further progress—re-develop—mature, if one will, differently than prior which may draw one to conclude Tupac never peaks (though, even in spirit, is always toward a summit). When experiencing an artist self-express from a/ close-deep reflection(s), one may find an engaging of a different experience with a/ varying observational parameter(s). For example, I wonder (randomly, curiously): what might an individual's work be like through a formal educational system? I appreciate the collection of poems; even so, here are poems I highly recommend from The Rose That Grew From Concrete by Tupac A. Shakur: "The Rose That Grew from Concrete," "In the Depths of Solitude," "Sometimes I Cry," "The Eternal Lament," "If I Fail," "What Is It That I Search 4," "God," "My Dearest One!!," "A Love Unspoken," "Forever and Today," "When I Do Kiss U," "Carmencita of the Bronx!," "Love Is Just Complicated," "Genesis (The Rebirth of My Heart)," "Elizabeth: A Different Love," "Love Within a Storm," "Hours Pass By," "Tears of a Teenage Mother," ""Where There Is a Will..."," "So I Say GOODBYE," and "In the Event of My Demise."


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua is a satirical memoir of Amy Chua’s life in relation to concepts of Chinese heritage in connection to her upbringing and progressing personal family relations (particularly in relation to child rearing). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to recognizing the term tiger mother (as controversial from a time ago) and wondering: what is all the hoopla about; what’s the idea or story(ies) behind the phraseology? The author is clear to indicate early in the text, the phraseology concerns styles of nurturing (which may be apparent, detectable, and/or trackable across many ethnic backgrounds—not only particular to a Chinese mother). I think of family long-term: legacy is vital and requires proper tending; a/ family(ies) needs good grounding(s) to ensure a/ good legacy(ies), to ensure a/ future generation(s) will succeed as well, if not far better than, prior generation (far better than prior generations is usually the optimal goal). The text subtly indicates though blatantly navigates concepts of legacy (especially coming from an immigrant background). The author indicates adjustments of behaviors/mentalities with modern social progressions and threads the consistency(ies) of necessity(ies) even in light of particular modern social progressions; a/ good skill(s), discipline with good effort(s), a/ good goal(s)—may always prove valuable. The text doesn’t delve much into the relationship between the parents though hints at a seemingly somewhat mutual respect toward concepts of aspects of logotherapy, culturing/nurturing a family, a/ legacy(ies), (arguably) mindfully toward success(es), respectively, though communally. I think the following texts may prove valuable for further deliberating concepts of contexts within Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua: Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by Dr. William Stixrud, PhD, and Ned Johnson, Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, and Mastery by Robert Greene.


Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

Build the Life You Want: The Art and Science of Getting Happier

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Build the Life You Want: The Art and Science of Getting Happier by Dr. Arthur C. Brooks, PhD, and Oprah Winfrey is a self-help type book hinging on being like an other-help type book (think the film Pay It Forward [2000]) working through qualitative and quantitative research. When perusing an Internom pop-up shop, I decide to buy then read the text due to a curiosity of contexts in relation to the title as well as from recognizing Oprah Winfrey's name as a part of the authorship of the text (I'm more familiar with Oprah Winfrey and books in connection with her book club). I feel as though the text offers advice to assist with transitioning between where one is toward better more in line with one's intention(s) across a myriad of concepts. The text has immediately practical implementable methods though acknowledges particular advice may take time (though how one may implement advice may likely depend on one personally for a reason or so). When reading the text, I feel as though the text functions like a/ particular coach(es) that may be able to connect well toward success with a/ particular athlete(s). I find the following texts may offer one further to deliberate with concepts within Build the Life You Want: The Art and Science of Getting Happier by Dr. Arthur C. Brooks, PhD, and Oprah Winfrey: Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by Dr. William Stixrud, PhD, and Ned Johnson, Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke, and The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance by Celeste Vaughan Curington, Jennifer H. Lundquist, and Ken-Hou Lin.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Dr. Matthew Walker, PhD, is an expounding for good-quality sleep (through quantitative and qualitative research).  When perusing an Internom pop-up shop, I decide to buy then read the text due to wanting to better understand sleep in a/ fuller, more well-rounding sense(s). The text offers immediately implementable valuable advice. Sleep intertwines every area of life, particularly for humans. I find the text proves evidence supporting good-quality sleep already is available and more good ways of approaching good-quality sleep are possible (inclusive of research toward further evidentially supporting good quality sleep). Aside from references the text already offers, I find the following texts may prove valuable in further deliberating contexts of concepts within Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Dr. Matthew Walker, PhD: The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by Dr. William Stixrud, PhD, and Ned Johnson, Outlive: The Science & Art of Longevity by Dr. Peter Attia with Bill Gifford, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by Dr. Lisa Mosconi, PhD, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, A Man's Guide to Healthy Aging: Stay Smart, Strong, and Active (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by Edward H. Thompson, Jr., and Lenard W. Kaye (with contributions from contributors which receive credits at the end of the book), and Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, M.D.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by Dr. William Stixrud, PhD, and Ned Johnson expounds for building/creating/establishing/working with what is within interdependent realities (through qualitative and quantitative research) bolstering one's life long-term in connection/relation with academia though apparently-well beyond/outside of academia, considering life in totality. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the book due to my wanting to be a more mindful-well-rounding individual especially in connection with progressing generations. I find the contexts to be so valuable to one's overall well-being, offering practical perspectives for one to consider life wholly, fully acknowledging variabilities of life. I find the expounding compelling, beyond/for parenting, beyond/for how one may better engage life and assist one toward better engaging life. The text offers a lot for one to deliberate in relation to progressing personally as well as to assisting another progress. The text is full of assisting references and practical-immediately-applicable-considering-long-term-progress methods. Additionally, I find the following texts may be good supplementally perspective-wise as well as in consideration of further well-rounding contexts within The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives: Outlive: The Science & Art of Longevity by Dr. Peter Attia with Bill Gifford, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, and Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, M.D.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufrene

Outliers: The Story of Success

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell is like a self-help-motivational-somewhat-autobiographical (minimally)-anthropological text of quantitative and qualitative research expounding extending/effects of cultural response(s), happenstance, opportunity(ies), systemic processes/progressions, concepts of/in relation to work, and upbringing amongst many other points. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the book due to a branching curiosity: how is the author attempting to use the term outliers? I appreciate the contexts of the text being encouraging toward finding a/ way(s) to succeed by laying out what one may control that may work that may help one better navigate one's life—toward success(es). The author acknowledges the text evolving from contexts in relation to works of Richard Nisbett. I find the following texts may be good supplemental texts well-rounding concepts within Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell: Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Mastery by Robert Greene, Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James, and The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity by David Graeber and David Wengrow.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., is a self-/other-help book guiding one practically (through quantitative and qualitative research) toward well-rounding an/ individual(s) from/within/beyond a/ limitless circumstance(s) which the author indicates other texts of the Positive Discipline series may cover in a/ different capacity(ies). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the text due to a curiosity of what the text might offer: what is positive discipline? I discover the text offers immediately implementable advice for anyone well-rounding (or seeking to well-round) an/ individual(s)(inclusive of one's self). I find the text extremely relevant in relation to modernity observing social transitions through time, to progress presently. The text offers tool kits that may be very helpful with implementing one's learning(s) from the text. The author acknowledges Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs' philosophy(ies) and teachings as groundings for Positive Discipline. I think the following texts may be good supplemental texts of Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D.: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, and Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Stars and Smoke

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Stars and Smoke by Marie Lu is a fictional-crime-thriller about a secret CIA subsidiary agency teaming with a superstar for a covert operation. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to wanting to read a fiction book and a playfully-branching-curiosity of the logline (lines, really, at the top of the back of the version of the book I buy). The text explores grief, familial/fraternal/romantic relations, desperation, loneliness, celebrity/public life, and private life (more so in relation to life in/through shadows though not as an individual with a life easily revealable—as a part of a measure of protection and confidentiality—than just personal). I like the text; I find aspects of the story amusing, subtly comical and the text overall as a fun-light read. I find the font/organization/spacing of the text makes the text easier to read. I like the journey through espionage in the story. The author acknowledges using resources to help with writing the book particularly mentioning an autobiography, Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA by Amaryllis Fox, and encouragement/inspiration from appreciating/observing BTS.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Greenlights

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey is a philosophical-poetic autobiography of Matthew McConaughey's life (to a particular point) seemingly attempting to  enlightentain (enlighten and/while entertaining/informing) one toward living one's choice life. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book from a curiosity branching from: what might Matthew McConaughey offer as a person, personally, aside from a role in a film? When reading the text, comically (thinking of films like How High [2001], Dazed and Confused [1993], Up In Smoke [1978]), at times, I wonder: is the statement I'm reading from Matthew McConaughey coming from a time when he's high on marijuana? I think the text offers somewhat progressive advice about being/becoming an acting partner/entertainer (aside from somewhat progressive advice about life in general) somewhat akin to I Can't Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart, Will by Will Smith and Mark Manson, and I'm Glad My Mom Died by Jennette McCurdy. I find the text gravitates about a down-to-earth tone appreciating life, as best as one may.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami (Translator: Jay Rubin) is a fictional tale (at times reading like a historical fiction, at times feeling as explicable as the film Parasite [2019] as well as an art-house film of a story—a posh-mosh novel) navigating marriage particularly connecting lineage in respect to personality as well as personality in connection with one's personal history (unfamiliar or not in the know of a current relationship—of a marriage), in (arguably beyond) union, intergenerational drama and trauma particularly in connection with sibling relations, cultural-generational drama and trauma particularly in connection progressions of economic stability/instability from perspectives before, within, and beyond war and politics, media, business, equity (extremely intelligently) in a myriad of forms (especially transformatively) particularly in relation to particular cultural-generational relationships affecting progressions of economic stability/instability from before, within, and beyond war and politics (heavily focusing between China, Japan, and Russia as well as connecting entities of circumstances the text mentions of particular periods), supernaturality, writing, thinking, women (in relation to abortion, being, equity—economically—socially), how one chooses to age, and health in general (particular mental health largely in relation to concepts of equity though in connection to death, life, and action in time [passing]). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to wanting to read a fictional tale. I love how the text approaches generational progressions through individual characters to form, respectively, an always coming of age outlay, interrogating: what is being? more so than: what is life? I find the text details well what highlights being and life is what might not be so bright, so immediately recognizable as apparent—though apparently present, requires digging or exploration of what already is (considering an excavation which is already complete or necessary). I find the text hopeful, offering healing as possible as well as necessary, indicating healing may be/come/look differently for anyone (through exemplifying how being present in life, living a good life, can be solace for another's living).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Honeybees and Distant Thunder

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Honeybees and Distant Thunder by Riku Onda (Translator: Philip Gabriel) is a wonderfully philosophical-poetically-musical-fictional tale about musicians, the natural world, music, and the supernatural world (amongst many other points). When perusing books in an Internom, I decide on buying then reading the text because of a curiosity of the title (aside from appreciating the book cover design): how do honeybees and thunder in a distance correlate? From the perspective of an athlete/competitor, I really enjoy the nuances of character development through realm(s) in relation to competition. I find the text offers perspectives well-considering age in connection to being with one's passion(s) progressively. I think the text offers balances of respect which can enrich any field (inclusive of respectively approaching a/ competitive avenue[s] of a particular field). I find the text offers beautiful perspectives to consider in connection with one's passion(s) that may be present elsewhere in another field one may not so readily recognize as having any aspect in connection with one's passion(s). I find the text grapples with maturity in a way acknowledging an/ acute sense(s) of being evolving through an/ interdependent reality(ies). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD, is a self-help type book of primarily qualitative research practically guiding toward improving communication between men and women (though the communication revolves around men and women primarily romantically I find the text balances well with considering improving communication generally). When perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I initially set the book down for a few weeks before returning to buy then read the book particularly considering the name in regard to a playful rhyme from elementary school in use to seemingly disparage one gender in comparison to another (in addition to the fact I'm always improving being a mindful individual as well as romantic/life partner). I really enjoy reading the text; I find the text funnier with each passing page as well as relevant to modernity. Additionally, I find the text considers personality more toward the end of the text though guides narratively well, entertainingly toward better communication. When reading the text, I think of two films for two different reasons: Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle (1989)(comically, contexts of the film grapple with sentiments of relations between men and women somewhat correlating with the text) and Letters to Juliet (2010)(in connection to the beauty of letter writing, like an ode to letter writing and correlative depth potentials of what may be of a letter/letter writing). I think the following can be wonderful supplemental texts of depths in relation to contexts within Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD: It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, and What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, offers practical advice in tidbits (through qualitative and quantitative research) to apply uniquely per day for seven days toward building one's self/relationship practically well long-term. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I find the text then decide to read the text since I am constantly improving practically so as to be a more mindful individual as well as romantic/life partner. I think the text offers sound advice and works especially well as a sounding board for one (or any in a/ romantic relationship[s]) seeking to self-/relationship-assess toward better communication and more mindfulness (even if only as confirming encouragement of what already is progressing). The text brings up particular topics such as emotional intelligence and familial/trauma which I think one may become more aware of (in a/ well-rounding sense[s]) toward healing and thriving practically through three particular texts: It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, and Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman. Additionally, the text offers resources supplementing contexts of the text in a/ way(s) that may assist one and/or any in a romantic/life partnership beyond the book itself.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman is like a case-study-self-though-bigger-than-self-help-type book about competencies (largely in relation to emotional intelligence) in connection with parameters of aspects of human spectrums. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the text due to finding the title intriguing then finding the correlating context(s) to the title even more intriguing as well as keenly relevant to modernity (realistically, concerning developing a/as a human being well, which makes the contexts so seemingly timeless). I'm really glad about reading the text after Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman because of a perspective dawning in my mind toward the end of Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman: how will one be in a world in which money is not a factor (everyone is wealthy and only pursues debt as a way to build credit)? How will humanity be—in a world at large, when everyone has everything financially necessary, plus more, materialistically, abundantly? The text devolves from anecdotal-qualitative-quantitative-observational research to detail aspects of human spectrums in connection with varying competencies (which really work together though the text delves into contexts of aspects of emotional intelligence more so to inform as well as guide any coming across emotional intelligence unaware of spectrums of emotional intelligence). I think the text is valuable for referential purposes and definitely sound to read carefully in connection with how one may be choosing to develop one's life long-term. I think It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, and Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James are great supplemental contexts to read with Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman. I'm really glad about reading Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman: I really think the contexts are valuable toward becoming a more mindful human being across all areas of human spectrums, toward good/better living, long-term.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Gambler

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Gambler by Fyodor Dostoevsky is a fiction story trailing an individual of Russian descent to extrapolate beyond ethnicity conversations/meanings of etiquette, risk, hope, ambition, purpose, education/learning to self-culture, self-development, short-term in connection with long-term developments, generational culturing, inheritance, romance in connection with maturity (as well as materialism though materialism in itself is a topic alone), stability as a human being aware of how to develop respectively reasonably well in society at large, and health (physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually) amongst other topics. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read The Gambler by Fyodor Dostoevsky because of the title. I remember a club wrestling coach in high school introducing the song, "The Gambler" by Kenny Rogers, to me. After listening to the song the first time, I find myself appreciating the lyrics sixteen years later (and I likely will continue to do so the rest of my life): I find the lyrics substantial as sound advice (particularly the chorus). I'm no stranger to Roulette though I'm not one to really gamble money for pleasure (really, I'm quite frugal). The story revolving around Roulette (heavily, though gambling in general [albeit particularly in connection with risk] most of all) is more interesting to me because of my history of actually playing Roulette (3-1) (the only other game that I remember even being willing to play at a casino is Craps though I've never come to play the game officially in a casino), I always leave with more than I enter with though I've only come to play because of being in an area for another reason or so (otherwise, I don't seek to attend any gambling event as a reason to be in a specific location—I don't derive any pleasurable sensation from gambling). I really enjoy the story because the writing is really good; depicting well human potential by choice behavior so effectively in such a timeline so clearly is appreciable and I think valuable to any reader that may not quite be astute to how one's own future(s) can actually be in one's control especially if one has a/ goal(s) in alignment with building one's future(s). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

How to Win Friends & Influence People

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie is like a self-help type book (though arguably so due to courses available in connection with aspects of the text in relation to varying aspects of life to assist in myriad ways beyond the text though inclusive of the information of the text) for any seeking to be more sociable successfully. Years ago in California, when introducing my merchandise to an individual, I recall the individual asking if I've ever come to read How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, to which I respond no (since not having done so then). More recently, perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the text from a branching curiosity, recalling the text being a great subject of benefit and interest to Warren Buffett (which I learn from reading The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder). I thoroughly enjoy the text as I find the text to be more of a somewhat comical form of insider guidance in being a more mindful individual in general amidst any way one may be able to feel so as to be more at peace and socially successful in life. The text advises to review the text in its entirety as well as particularly at least once a month (though as a study, so one may do so potentially as much as one may like/find beneficial) which I think actually is quite sensible for any that may not genuinely attribute through one's being sentiments of which the text discusses. I find the text quite valuable as a way to educate and encourage an/ individual(s) toward a/ better route(s) of being.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman is like an amalgamation of research with an/ objective-philosophical underpinning(s) in relation to nearly, if not, all aspects of business (while respectfully acknowledging itself as more of a foundational approach than an end-all for learning [considering that one must continue self-educating respectfully] though offers valuable information that can assist one in a/ way(s) that can benefit one as much as, if not more, than processes of obtaining an MBA might). When browsing books at an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to my curiosity of the book title's meaning and how the information the book might contain might constitute such a title as objectively-relevant. If the text is justifiable as a source for one to follow in lieu of pursuing an MBA depends entirely upon an individual's approach with education and information (as well as other facets of one's life in connection to one's life choices, goal[s], objectives, intentions) (the book doesn't completely dismiss earning an MBA though clarifies a/ reason[s] one might benefit from having/obtaining an MBA, purposefully). I think the text offers valuable information that may greatly benefit one approaching business, even if not as an owner, if even only a part of a developing business—though, the advice can connect well other areas of life at large aside from business. I like the way the text integrates aspects of the human spectrum(s) in relation to business (considering a necessity for one to know one's self well). I think the text will be useful as a reference book especially due to its organization making finding a/ particular topic(s) easier. Additionally, the book explicitly states the information within it, so as not to be misleading, and there are offerings to other resources that may assist one with a/ particular topic(s) for one to further self-educate.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Promised Land

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Promised Land by Barack Obama is like a journal-letter factually and philosophically navigating Obama's journey (largely Obama's career journey and anything pertinent in connection to Obama's career journey) from childhood into about the end of his first term as president of the United States of America. While perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read A Promised Land by Barack Obama because of actually not acknowledging Obama (entering my awareness as a president of the United States in 2008) more than as I might a family member having a/ responsibility(ies) to fulfill especially as an individual I recognize as older than I. Additionally, I never expectantly put any weight on Obama because I recall my world(s) being quite different entering my undergraduate years of college (which I acknowledge quite thoroughly in my albums Light of Times and Love, of Times) especially as an individual more so in connection with books, movies, music, sports (particularly wrestling as a student-athlete going through growing pain[s]), and video games than efforts channeling (however sparsely) through popular media at the time. I recall my roommate telling me about Obama winning the election as an explanation for a raucous roar I hear and ask about from my/our dorm room on a hill in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania in 2008. With maturity—years later—I recall finding the book, Audacity to Win by David Plouffe in my mom's living quarters, then reading the book with a clearer understanding of not only the developing world at large though myself as an appreciator. I genuinely enjoy good success(es) of a competitively fair world at large. Growing up through diverse backgrounds, I don't recall having an expectation of anyone beyond responsibility(ies) which resounds well with me in my life especially considering that I believe a main responsibility any human has is to live an objectively good worthy life especially if with the capability(ies) to live an objectively good worthy life. 


Reading the text, I mull ideas of which I've come to think of before though more so when reading the text:


1.) In senses of athletic-competitiveness, a/ political action(s) seems like a/ sense(s) of effort(s) one may feel one must apply in order to be successful—to win—though an/ other portion(s) exist of which is/are seemingly beyond basic rules of a game that seem to coincide with ruling, gaming, and fitting—which one may argue does or does not prove valuable for a champion—whatever one is attemption to champion—though a/ contentious-contrite action(s) may seem of good fervor when establishing competitive sports teams. Will politicians behave differently if with political sports teams mandatory on the sides of political duties? (Good exercise can work a world of good.)


2.) Nuclear warheads don't make any nation powerful, good organizations of people and efficient structures do. If a country decides to blow up every country, what will that country prove able to build, if only able to prove destructive? Destruction is not a good wagering tool. Nuclear warheads—though a persistent reality of less than fear more so of not knowing from a/ time(s) when an/ individual(s) operate in a less visible world in which the fantastic of the imagination leaves one to determine how one will choose to rationalize into the unknown everyone faces—even with a good plan—may propel an/ individual(s) to any sense of true security (navigations of a/ feeling[s] of which any can scientifically locate through research, in modernity, that one must choose to identify, channel, or confirm through one's being) though a film like Super 8 (2011), Eight Legged Freaks (2002), or The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) may more than likely draw individuals to a theater than procure a fear of train tracks, film making, or anywhere a spider may be (I hope) in modernity.


I like A Promised Land by Barack Obama because I think the text offers an/ insider perspective(s) for anyone that may really care about ongoings of/in connection with the Oval Office. Additionally, I think the text can offer more grounding to a reality that a/ happening(s) in connection with Oval Office is/are workings of employees on a/an national/international stage in comparison to a/ job(s)/position(s) that may have to deal with a/ similar level(s) of scrutiny(ies) on a/ reasonably incomparable scale(s). Additionally, I think the text offers enough detail(s) for one to make a reasonable consideration of one's position in the world as a human being, of one's humaneness, one's way(s) of choice being, in respect to geography as well as sociography.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa is like a ledger of a memoir concerning Nelson Mandela's life primarily in connection with developing South Africa on his way to becoming president, as president, and post presidency. When perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa because of being more aware of the name than the person or anything in connection with the person (of who I come to learn of as an integral part of history). I'm Haitian and (quite aware of my Haitian history) learn so much of elements establishing a country functionally in tandem with the global collective (even in contrast to growing beyond a state of apartheid—which I think any country that experiences a form of colonialism or social intranational drama might be able to comprehend) from the book which makes me greatly consider how a/ nation(s) and/or person/people may progress well after obtaining a/ freedom(s) then entering (if not already within) a global collective atmosphere of different socio-economic happenings as well as progressions (especially considering a period [of history] when/where/how such may occur). I enjoy reading Nelson Mandela's speeches as well as appreciate his approache(s) to navigating toward a better future for all willing to be proactive toward a better future (of which I feel I experience evidence of through glimpses of Nelson Mandela's presidency), knowing that consistent-good efforts may take time to prove effective.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder is somewhat of a biography of Warren Buffett: I use the term somewhat due to the text expounding on finance, ethics, and politics through more so than Warren Buffett's life though happenings in connection with Warren Buffett's life as well as individuals in connection with Warren Buffett throughout his life sharing a seemingly meaningful connection with Warren Buffett as well as the happenings connecting to a situation that may involve Warren Buffett; the portion of the title concerning the "Business of Life" needs acknowledgement to ensure a/ reader(s) understand concepts concerning most, if not all, that encompasses aspects of an/ economy(ies) receives attention throughout the text. When perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I buy then read the The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder (primarily from a curiosity) (because I understand the importance of practically building a good family so) wondering how a family with vast amounts of wealth might be (even considering all families are different). I learn so much from the book about business that I feel so much more knowledgeable about how businesses can process: I feel like The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder and A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin are perfect companions especially for any with a/ mindset(s) of life in connection with business as well as exploring life as a mindful individual developing a/ mindset(s) for good growth(s). After reading the text, I find the world somewhat larger and intricate especially through a/ practical economical lense(s). More so, I appreciate Ben Graham's perspective on the importance of how one lives as well as Warren Buffett's perspective on love especially in connection with financial abundance. The text does not offer any bias to elevate Warren Buffett on a pedestal. I think the text offers details to help one navigate one's life by answering a branching question I've come to develop through my/ observation(s) of the text: Where can one be not just a stellar employee of value—where can one be a stellar person improving/appreciating value—and how can one do both (especially if one is not in a position with a title that might be where anyone may be looking for [a/the stellar individual] who anyone might think needs to be in a certain way or so, is—though [a/the stellar individual] is in a position in life being so)? 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Secret

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Secret by Rhonda Byrne carries motivational sentiments of core philosophies and sciences across myriads of topics in direct relation to one's being. While perusing books in a Barnes and Noble a few years ago, I remember meeting an individual asking if I've yet to read The Secret in a voice making me feel as though the individual is sharing a secret with me, then the individual departs from my presence: more recently, upon perusing books at a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to purchase then read the text.  Each section of the book offers advice which flows so well with parts of information from other texts I've come to read (in relation to particular topics); (with balances of health) Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup; (with aspects of psychoneuroimmunology/healing) The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn; and (with core concepts the text expounds toward guiding one in a/ way[s] to fulfilling one's life as one wants) I find the text grounds best practically in relation to Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza and Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill due to the energetic intentions of both latter texts as well as practical steps with (anecdotal, qualitative, quantitative) evidential supports. I feel as though The Secret is easily digestible with tidbits from advising-motivating-teaching professionals as well as the author's commentative encouragement especially considering the organization of the text being seemingly so anyone can read the text understandably without having to be a professional in any particular field: the summaries at the end of each section can be helpful for any needing quick referential reminders of a section. I appreciate the intentions of the book because I think fulfilling one's life in the best-good ways possible for one personally is awesome so if The Secret leads one to do so awesome: additionally, I think myriad forms of texts like The Secret exist (refer to a few books I mention in this review) that offer methodologies that may be helpful for individuals branching from different circumstances of being that may require different guidance.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Mastery

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Mastery by Robert Greene comprehensively (reasonably, in accordance with the author's intentions/scope[s]) though specifically in connection to particular individuals' lives illumines elements of becoming as well as being masterful at any stage of one's life (at any stage of one's life not necessarily only coinciding with one's age more so than perhaps one's skill level in connection with one's being [considering all aspects of human spectrums, consciously and subconsciously]). The anecdotal-qualitative text offers more so mental and willful approaches to comprehending how an individual may progress toward a particular avenue of one's choice(s): I feel like I'm reading a self-help/self-empowerment book motivating one toward fulfilling one's being by acknowledging myriad aspects of one's self (and/or selves). I find the text enjoyable and fulfilling to read: I like the methodologies through individuals—most of which I've never come to hear about until reading the text—with the contemplative philosophizing commentary of the author which leaves one with more resources (perspective/information-wise) so as to self-assess (and/or debate, reasonably) moving forward in one's own life. Additionally, I like the clear organization of the book especially due to the variances of perspective with reiterative concepts that don't muddle throughout the book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez is a necessary read for anyone (even if just curious) about relevancies of informing gender data gaps contributing toward good practical measures toward gender equality more so than gender neutrality. Upon entering an Internom, I find myself browsing many books of interest. I decide to buy then read Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez largely because I care about developing perspectives and research in relation to women's well-being (especially in light of the reality that many books I read in order to be a more mindful romantic life partner [especially texts concerning women's health] note a/ necessity[ies] for more research on women's well-being). I care about human development toward improvement so reading a text of the sort by Caroline Criado Perez increases my awareness about culture areas in relation to women's (which, of course, means in relation to all humanity) well-being in society at large. Concerning women's health in relation to contexts of the text about doctors, I advise any woman to use sound resources to find a good doctor especially if in relation to one's genital areas: texts like Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom: Creating Physical and Emotional Health and Healing by Dr. Christiane Northrup, MD, Dr. Nita's Crash Course for Women: Better Sex, Better Health, Better You by Dr. Nita Landry, MD, OB-GYN, and The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina: Separating the Myth from the Medicine by Dr. Jen Gunter, MD, can be supportive (all the while acknowledging a necessity for more research concerning women's health). Additionally, reading the text, I think of Tantric Orgasm for Women by Diana Richardson, recalling Diana Richardson's attentiveness to improving relations between men and women in order to fully embrace ascending in better ways toward a better union of abundance and understanding, which I think leads toward a better overall world at large. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Essential Kafka

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Essential Kafka by Franz Kafka (with an introduction by a John R. Williams of St. Andrews) is a collection of stories of varying length by Franz Kafka. Browsing a school library's selection, I find the text then decide to borrow then read the text due to an interest in reading a copy of The Trial by Franz Kafka, at my crib (my mom's place), many years ago. After reading the collection, I find the text so valuable that in light of owning a company with many employees in the future, I will give every applicant a copy of the text after becoming an employee particularly for The Trial, The Castle, and Metamorphosis: I think the stories offer important perspectives to consider in relation to one's life purpose in connection to worlds of work as much as about contexts of socio-economic well-being in aside from as well as in relation to romance. The author carries a comical tone through each of the stories as though an observant insider that has naught else to do but find comedy amidst all happenings. Even so, one may gather from Letter to My Father that Franz Kafka's writing flows as somewhat of a therapeutic process to bring understanding from a life that respects life as is though contemplates life as more philosophically. Additionally, I find greater values to understanding social as well as economic ideas within Kafka's stories more apparent after reading Debt: The First 5000 Years by David Graeber because concepts of debt permeate throughout Kafka's lengthier pieces (The Trial, The Castle, Metamorphosis, Letter to My Father) seemingly from a point of life that Kafka can only come to terms with ever so clearly within Letter to My Father (which feels like a must-read that may help well-round one's perspective[s] of Franz Kafka's stories) though may never in a way have to repay, not because the debts are unpayable, due to a/ reflective practical understanding(s). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Husband I Bought

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Husband I Bought by Ayn Rand is drama-type short story about (primarily) Henry and Irene (on the surface) though one may argue the story is always about more than Henry and Irene's relationship with each other. After entering a favorable discussion about Ayn Rand, The Husband I Bought comes up as a recommendation though is unavailable for purchase at the time, then a wonderful surprise comes in the form of news: the short story becomes available for purchase in a book form with an English as well as Mongolian translation meeting in the middle of the text (at least in certain stores  in Mongolia)! After buying then reading the book form of the short story from an Internom, I engage in a discussion of the text with the recommender. Ayn Rand is a clever writer situating stories in connection with individuals as well as livelihoods in a way or so that acknowledges life is always around a corner whether that be the interior of a character or an extension beyond and/or within an environmental physical understanding. The text seems to engage concreteness with slipperiness so as to reveal a perspective of a perspective of an underlying perspective of a continuous cycle of perspectives necessary to divulge the core of Ayn Rand's meanings (such character and situational developments will be quite familiar to any familiar with Ayn Rand's larger texts such as Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead) throughout the short story. Even so, Ayn Rand's story developments on a seemingly smaller scale (in respect to her larger stories of a seemingly larger scale, more so of contexts and actual physical elements of a story in book form) in The Husband I Bought are compelling to discuss especially regarding socio-economic understandings in accordance with the available contexts within the short story. I feel so many connotations between such a short story and Jane Austen's Persuasion (realistically, more so than Persuasion, of course, any familiar with Jane Austen's stories will find many socio-economic underpinnings at play conflicting with society at large in tandem with private vs. public life in Jane Austen's stories): the tangles between wealth, status, love, and/or happiness comparatively from beyond and within colloquial to more global understandings can always seem to be quite riveting, entertaining because one can agree in a way or so though find such a way or so very disagreeable (alas, the discussions leave one to contemplate standards of character and moral in connection with long-term living understandings versus any sense of immediate need, while one must define need and/or want for one's self). I'm glad about reading the text and enjoy the text even more with a discussion thereafter (reading the text).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Phantom of the Opera

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux is a mystery of architecture and engineering traversing practical existences in connection with human psyches through explorations of the opera. After finding the text in a library, I recall wanting to read the story many years ago after experiencing a  short visual experience on a television: so, I decide to borrow the book from the library (then finish reading the story). The deeper I am into the story, I feel a sense that I am entering and exiting areas of Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy as much as the story begins espousing the core relation of misery being a driving force for a main antagonist's proceedings (branching from a traumatic familial upbringing) in connection with Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe. Reading the text, I find the author correlates well manners of abuse as well as behavior generally concerning different levels of an employment (employer/employee) complex by bringing differing perspectives of distance from the contexts of employment via the opera (especially through a ghastly presence which seemingly supercedes all in relation to systems of employment via the opera though is practically in connection with the opera via economical senses). The investigative environment of the story allows differing perspectives to thrive in unique ways (which I advise any reader to carefully regard to better comprehend the story in fuller comprehensive senses). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Dr. Nita’s Crash Course for Women: Better Sex, Better Health, Better You

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Dr. Nita’s Crash Course for Women: Better Sex, Better Health, Better You by Dr. Nita Landry, MD, OB-GYN, brings up-to-date research and science to increase one's awareness about sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women. After spying the book during a walk through Barnes and Noble, I decide to buy then read the book especially because the text is one of the more recent texts I've come across concerning sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women. I enjoy improving how I may be a better romantic/life partner and learning about sexual developments in general though specifically-largely in connection to women helps me become a more aware-mindful individual (especially in relation with my [future] romantic/life partner). While reading the text, I feel as though the book is worth carrying to one's medical appointments because the organization of the text caters to ensuring one is receiving the most appropriate care in relation to one's health. The text offers assisting dialogue to help an individual and/or a patient as well as a healthcare professional make more sense of near any situation in connection with sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women. The text offers many resources for one to further discover more assisting information about a particular area of sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women. I really like the text, and I find the organization of the information in the text can be really helpful for a lay reader of medical texts about sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women. Additionally, I find the text brings to light the importance of funding research about sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women especially since analyzing as well as defining developing aspects of parameters of sexual health in general though specifically-largely in connection to women may lead to a healthier more aware-mindful human society at large.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Acupressure and Reflexology For Dummies

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Acupressure and Reflexology For Dummies by Synthia Andrews and Bobbi Dempsey introduces practices of Acupressure and Reflexology useful for any practitioner on any practical level. After mulling over ways I may be a better romantic/life partner, I decide to buy then read the book about Acupressure and Reflexology to find the ancient holistic-traditional-medicinal-like practices to be sound regarding mind-body interconnections. The text offers insights that allow for one to create one's own effective practices for any particular (mind-body connection) reason while ensuring to advise that Acupressure and Reflexology are of a spectrum of holistic-traditional-medicinal-like practices which support each other. The authors don't leave one to even assume Acupressure and/or Reflexology will be an ultimate resolve for all of one's potential health needs. Additionally, the text offers other resources via an Appendix to ensure any reader may find more pertinent information in accordance with one's particular need(s). I like the text: I find a different way to address my mind-body interconnection(s) practically. I appreciate the offerings of the text methodically toward appreciating aspects of one's body and mind, personally, takeaways that assist in approaching one's body and mind in a/ different way(s). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Foot Book: Everything You Need to Know to Take Care of Your Feet

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Foot Book: Everything You Need to Know to Take Care of Your Feet by Dr. Todd Brennan, DPM, FACFAS, FABPM, and Dr. Leslie Johnston, DPM, contains information about foot health, navigating situations one may encounter with one's feet. I remember deciding on buying then reading the book the same day I decide so for The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by Dr. Lisa Mosconi, PhD, though make the actual purchase of The Foot Book: Everything You Need to Know to Take Care of Your Feet, later. I take care of my feet, and I'm into healthy feet. I read the book to be more mindful of feet health especially considering my future romantic life partner(s) (her lifestyle may require particular attention to her feet). What better support may I be supporting her support(s) well? I like the text and feel like I have a better idea of a/ Podiatric perspective(s) in a/ way(s) that may help me navigate toward a/ healthier parameter(s) of feet/foot health.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Catch-22 (50th Anniversary Edition)

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


Catch-22 (50th Anniversary Edition) by Joseph Heller follows fictional tales of a squadron espousing intricacies of war heavily regarding militarism/war in the early to middle 20th century, heaving a cross industry relevance in relation to modernity. After a conversation at a 4th of July event in which an individual uses the term "Catch-22," I decide on buying then reading the book for a better understanding especially since at the time I am vaguely familiar with the term by ear though not by any definition. The author writes extremely well, correlating concepts of militarism/war thematically through each chapter, character, sentence, paragraph—which leaves one to explore the marrow of a subject though to never truly understand what the marrow of a subject is, which is exactly what the story is trying to bring a reader to. Observing a Catch-22 happens more often than not now when I'm moving about in the world, a nice phraseology to define exactly what is that prior understanding the phraseology might need more words to explain though even with the phraseology needs explaining. Of course, the phraseology is to lead us through conversations of ambition, beaurocracy, private enterprise, family, finances, being/one's purpose, faith, hope, religion, romance, potential physiological/psychological affects and much more (each to a varying degree or so concerning a particular topic) in connection to militarism/war. I really like the writer's style conveying the story so a/ reader(s) grasp(s) the reality of the importance of choosing and variances of decision making which revolve through varying levels of comedy (expounding personality all throughout) maintaining ideas connecting a/ little picture(s) to a/ big picture(s). I love the poetic touches which really help fulfill scenes. The supplementary material offers a bit of general and publishing background of the author and text (by the author as well as other entities like reviewers, critics, and scholars).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Miracle on High Street: The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of St. Benedict's Prep in Newark, N.J.

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Miracle on High Street: The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of St. Benedict's Prep in Newark, N.J. by Thomas McCabe (one of my history teachers in high school) is somewhat of an anecdotal-qualitative-quantitative historical exploring of St. Benedict's Preparatory School into modernity from the establishment's beginnings in alignment with what is truly at the core of igniting such a development: the establishing of human souls to thrive in life. Attending an event with alumni from different schools from within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark, I actually receive the book as a gift from John Allen. Being an alumnus of St. Benedict's Preparatory School, I find the happenings of the establishment profound, and I'm appreciative of understanding the contexts in which the establishment transforms. As a former student of St. Benedict's Preparatory School, I'm no stranger to a good portion of its history though the connection(s) with the full context brings new information which makes me better understanding certain social aspects of a developing America especially considering Newark is hub. Analyzing the text, I have another assisting understanding of potential domino effects of social developments branching from individuals learning at a particular age then entering the world at large (especially since those individuals are in and/or entering midlife when I am born into the developing world):


"Like their neighborhoods, schools turned from white to black; for example, the formerly all-white high school in the predominantly Jewish Weequahic section went from 19 percent African American enrollment in 1961, to 70 percent in 1966, to more than 80 percent in 1968. It happened so quickly that the Board of Education could not update textbooks in time either. In a history class, a black youngster read the following from the class text: "The people of Africa are not white like we are."" (McCabe, p. 161)


I'm glad to be living in a world seemingly more aware, collaborative, and communicative in most, if not all, good ways socially. Even so, understanding the contexts of which an establishment is growing from, through, and beyond provides a deeper contextual understanding of that which America is shaping from, through, and beyond. I recall the high school selection process. I actually decide to go to Seton Hall Preparatory School to play football to succeed in the NFL, to be near my girlfriend at the time living in West Orange (about a fifteen-minute walk from my living quarters at the time), and to be in walking distance (from my living quarters at the time) to the school. My mother, one of the kindest-hardest-working individuals one may come across in life, thwarts my decision, so I attend St. Benedict's Preparatory School. Ever since, I do find I walk the world as an anomaly though have come to accept the world as an amalgamation of anomalies. I'm grateful about meeting so many individuals in my life, and I'm glad to be somewhat a part of St. Benedict's Preparatory School's prestigious history. St. Benedict's Preparatory School is co-ed now, and I think is wonderfully developing (as far as I know from the outside). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


McCabe, Thomas. (2011). Miracle on High Street: The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of St. Benedict's Prep. Fordham University Press.

Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship by Dr. Stephen Snyder, M.D., expounds qualitative research through romantic relations from sex therapy sessions to inform practically toward a healthy(ier) sex life. Perusing Amazon book suggestions from books I recently order about relationships and sex, I decide to buy then read Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship to encourage an idea that I may always learn more about a/ way(s) to improve a/ relationship(s) so as to be a better romantic/life partner as well as a growingly-healthier-mindful individual (especially since I'm already done reading so many awesome books especially of the sort, that are valuable and definitely awesome references, some of which Dr. Stephen Snyder, M.D., mentions in Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship). While reading the text, I find a sex therapist can be a useful intercession for a couple that may need professional coaching at a comfortable pace especially respective to each partner's need(s) and/or want(s). I find a lot of the information in the text correlates directly to working concepts in It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn and Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup. Additionally, I'm very appreciative of tantra especially in connection to sex and relationships (even more so now) because core offerings in Love Worth Making: How to Have Ridiculously Great Sex in a Long-Lasting Relationship are of tantric methods (otherwise, many offerings connect deeply with psychoneuroimmunology though for a layperson more so than a fellow in research [unless fellows in research communicate so, as is in the text]). I like the appendix in the back of the book which is like a brief overview of core concepts of the text. I enjoy reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by Dr. Lisa Mosconi, PhD, is largely (quantitative research) about cognitive development (though touches on overall health) and preventative measures to live a healthier life free of (at least to experience less of symptoms of menopause, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Diabetes, Hypertension...) near anything that may lead to cognitive decline in an individual though focusing on women (including comparative data relevant for both men and women). Waiting for a start of a film in a nearby theater, I walk to a nearby Barnes and Noble to walk around, and my curiosity peaks at a couple of books (though my proactive willingness toward ensuring to better understand my future romantic/life partner as an individual as well as a woman is reason for my buying then reading The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease). Men and women are very different biologically especially concerning aspects of the human brain. The text offers a lot more information (which I find very relevant) concerning environmental effects on human development. I find discovering and exploring information of the sort will help my future romantic/partner and I enjoy more satisfying-well-rounding lives with every zeptosecond. I like the text a lot, and I am glad a lot more headway is happening (especially clinically) for the advancement of women's (realistically, human's) health.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Tantra: The Supreme Understanding

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Tantra: The Supreme Understanding by Osho is a text encouraging to be, more aware, growing more aware—through being. After reading The Heart of Tantric Sex and Tantric Orgasm for Women by Diana Richardson (both of which I really like), I decide to buy then read Tantra: The Supreme Understanding due to Osho being one of Diana Richardson's primary inspirational sources as well as Barry Long: I figure I may be able to get a better understanding of tantra doing so though am very appreciative of Diana Richardson's focuses with tantra through immediately applicable methods. Reading Tantra: The Supreme Understanding feels like I'm reading (note the text is a compilation of live recordings from Osho) a dialogue of an individual self-talking, talking with another while trying to tell me something sound though with a lot of examples that make me feel like the individual is between belligerent and intelligent (in overall non-menacing senses). Osho states in the text that the dialogue is to be so seemingly contradictory as well as extreme due to operating in metaphorical spheres so as to better navigate one toward being one's self. Osho seems to indicate for a/ reader(s) to take any part of the dialogue with a huge grain of salt into a fresh-open wound to grow in the world (at large) as one is though in a/ way(s) for which one is to grow. Osho is clear stating in the dialogue a/ way(s) a/ discussion(s) might go if one approaches Osho personally for life coaching. I think one may learn more about Osho than tantra throughout reading the text though I offer a few sentences that can sum the core of the text well;


  1. Learn your self.

  2. Build your self.

  3. Create your life.

  4. Embrace your life.

  5. Be your self.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Heart of Tantric Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Heart of Tantric Sex by Diana Richardson is about being more aware and conscious sexually though the meditative practices as well as philosophies toward being more aware and conscious sexually transcend physical planes. I begin researching for other texts about sex after reading The Joy of Sex by Dr. Alex Comfort, M.B., D.Sc. (especially branching my search from/after discovering The Complete Kāma Sūtra: The First Unabridged Modern Translation of the Classic Indian Text (translation by Alain Daniēlou [inclusive of help from Kenneth Hurry])). The author indicates grounding for initial developments of the text in the Introduction:


"The depth and detail of information given by Barry Long changed the course of my life...Furthermore, it enabled me to understand and absorb, in a bodily way, the words of my spirtual master, Osho. He includes a vision of spirtuality through sex, woven together with interpretations of the ancient Tantric scriptures which were born in India thousands of years ago..." (Richardson, 2003/2008, pp. 11–12).


Even so, I'm a bit skeptical about the direction of the text after reading a portion of the text at the end of the author's Introduction: 


"This book is an attempt to share practical information about sex that created a subtle and significante revolution in my life. It is by no means intended to be a comprehensive presentation of the origins or intricate esoteric aspects of Tantra—it is simply a personal experience" (Richardson, 2003/2008, 12).


Yet, I find the author develops a very sound and valuable text particularly because of the Love Keys as well as meditative practices flowing with reasonably philosophy.  I feel like skillfully I'm a multipotentialite concerning sex styles though I'm a Tantric lover, at heart. The text is sexually well-rounding, considering dynamics that may affect one more so than sexually, always leading toward healing and healthily heightening sexual developments. Additionally, I find aspects of The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, and Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup in relation to psychoneuroimmunology concerning being healthily-mindfully present with one's self as well as another practically are throughout the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Richardson, D. (2008). The Heart of Tantric Sex. John Hunt Publishing. (Original work published in 2003). 

The Joy of Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Joy of Sex by Dr. Alex Comfort, M.B., D.Sc., is a creative exploration toward pleasurably-sexually enlivening a/ relationship(s) through mindful play. The text is a re-invention by Susan Quilliam with familial support from the original author's son Nick Comfort. To be clear of the/ direction(s) of which the text is coming from/moving toward, here is a direct quote from the chapter "on gourmet lovemaking":


"To draw parallel, chef-grade cooking doesn't happen naturally: it starts at the point where people    know how to prepare and enjoy food, are curious about it and willing to take trouble preparing it. read recipe hints, and find they are helped by one or two techniques. It's hard to make mayonnaise by trial and error, for instance. Gourmet sex, as we define it, is the same — the extra one can get from comparing notes, using some imagination, trying way out or new experiences, when one already is making satisfying love and wants to go on from there." (Comfort, 2008, pp. 24–25)


After discovering the text while reading, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, I buy the text out of pure curiosity of good ways I may improve (as I enjoy). The text mindfully considers potential "sorts of readers" and indicates further in the chapter "on gourmet lovemaking" that "most people will use our notes as a personal one-couple notebook from which they might get ideas...One of the original aims of this book was to cure the notion, born of non-discussion, that common sex needs are odd or weird..." (Comfort, 2008, pp. 24–25) though is clear to acknowledge the text is for the more creative sexual explorers looking for more sexual menu options, if you will. The aloofness of the text away from anger/negativity/sadness toward joyful creative sexual play makes the text more fun to read. I like the sexual illustrations as well as references to aspects of more ancient cultural sexual domains. I think the text is most valuable when one reads the text as the author intends for one to understand the text as well as benefit from the knowledge of aspects of sexual creative play.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Comfort, Alex. (2008). The Joy of Sex. Harmony Books.

What to Expect When You're Expecting

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff is a text covering most, if not all, aspects of a couple progressing before, through, and beyond a/ pregnancy(ies). I'm constantly improving considering myself alone as well in relation to an/other good partnering entity(ies). Researching to answer curious questions I have about sex in a/ relationship(s) progressing with a pregnancy, I discover What to Expect When You're Expecting then decide to buy then read the all-encompassing guiding-informative text about a/ relationship(s) before, through, and beyond most, if not all, aspects of a/ pregnancy(ies). Even before the text answers my questions, I begin finding more appreciations for pregnancy, relationships, and women. The text guides through all stages of pregnancy from beginning to end with a clear path from before the beginning of the trimester through to the end of a set third trimester (though covers aspects of a seemingly necessary fourth trimester). I read the text all the way through from beginning to end: I think the text works very well as a reference text for individuals familiar with most, if not all, aspects of a/ pregnancy(ies) and/or after reading through the text completely once. The author advises skipping Chapter 19 if not experiencing any complication(s) to avoid/prevent unnecessary stress though I think reading the entire text in tandem with planning a/ pregnancy(ies) can prove valuable long-term (each relationship can be different, to each one's own). I want to plan a/ pregnancy(ies) with my future romantic-life partner (whoever she may be). I find the text to be very relevant and valuable.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Debt: The First 5000 Years

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Debt: The First 5000 Years by David Graeber anthropologically explores debt beyond traditional historical as well as economical methodical perspectives through concepts evidentially proving varying forms of economy reasoning toward better understanding underlying premises largely contributing to the establishment of modern economical parameters. After reading The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity by David Graeber and David Wengrow (such an overall beautiful conversation), I research both authors a bit more and decide toward more of David Graeber's works which stand out to me as quite relevant (I even discover one of his works of which I remember reading an article on, about five years ago. Additionally, I think reading Debt: The First 5000 Years after The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity is a sound approach [I find the text is easier to read due to reading in such an order—though to each one's own]). I have an appreciation for David Graeber's well-rounding research enlightening and informing without bias against objective truth (truth that is not working for institutional appeal or seemingly like for a commissioning entity—truth that is relevant for a layperson) emboldens the evidential supports as well as David Graeber's honesty through different contexts of reality. I find the text is extremely relevant and quite a wonderful read. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

I Love the Earth

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I Love the Earth by Todd Parr is a children's type book of positive affirmations about wanting good for the well-being of Earth and all in connection with Earth—the universe. I read the text before buying it as  a gift. I like the feel good text and reread the text multiple times. Even so, I think the text can prompt one to question—in some instances—how, why? I like that at the end of the book is a list of ten rules one can apply to help one help Earth.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century by Steven Pinker is a self-help type book concerning grammar, editing, and stylistically writing. I remember buying the book about three years ago randomly searching Amazon. I don't find anything wrong with assessing a different perspective or so especially when concerning anything in relation to publishing such as writing, editing, etc. toward good. I find the text insightful with intermittent comedic moments. I like the author's logical approach in certain respects concerning punctuation and style. I think the text can be useful as a reference especially as the text acknowledges insights of other entities catering to responsibilities of caring for grammar and style concerning letters, words, and writing. I think anyone can find any portion of the text useful: I like to highlight "Chapter 3: The Curse of Knowledge" most of all the chapters though I find value in sections concerning punctuation as well as organization of words. The first paragraph of chapter one sits well with me as I read the rest of the text as a good reminder (which the author iterates time and time again) to adhere to an aspect of the author's premise acknowledging sentiments of a Purist vs. a Writer and/or Layperson (if one will):


""Education is an admirable thing," wrote Oscar Wilde, "but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught." In dark moments while writing this book, I sometimes feared that Wilde might be right. When I polled some accomplished writers about which style manuals they had consulted during their apprenticeships, the most common answer I got was "none". Writing, they said, just came naturally to them." (Pinker, 11).


I like the text though I find the quote from Oscar Wilde to be considering a limiting idea of education as one may consider school in multiplicitous ways.


Pinker, Steven. (2015). The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. Penguin Books.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Song of Ice and Fire: A Dance With Dragons

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin is the fifth book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. The text continues devolving complex relationships, telling stories of characters not in A Feast of Crows (the fourth book in A Song of Ice and Fire series) before eventually combining all characters appropriately for purposes of fulfilling A Dance With Dragons. I find myself in a space of relief after finishing the text. Reading each book (so far) in A Song of Ice and Fire is fun. Overall, I like the story so far (largely because of the character development), and I feel like the author maintains consistencies in telling the stories which ensure each book is interesting. A Dance With Dragons hosts varying complex themes which I think are important such as aging (as a person of duty, as a woman/man, as a child, as a dragon, as a parent), maturity (as a leader, as a parent/a family member, as a person of duty), self-awareness (comparing/contrasting human characteristics, concerning attraction, deliberating as an adult in an ever changing world bigger than one's self, engaging concepts of freedom as a human being distinct from a position as well as in a position), governments and peoples (an intricate kneading throughout the books that I don't feel one can ignore at all because people make a society), and coin (a controversial distraction—are words only wind?) amongst other themes. I like the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Light We Carry by Michelle Obama is an autobiographical self help type book which feels more like a journey through the wisdom the author gains through her relationships which she finds highly valuable for individuals to consider moving in life personally. I end up buying The Light We Carry because of not having my original copy of Becoming to share with my mom seeking to read Becoming, so I buy both texts (initially only having an interest in reading The Light We Carry—I'm glad about reading the text beyond my interest). The author grounds the text in important values for one alone though greatly connecting to values/social values valuing one's self and relationships—leading to as well as building valuable relationships—valuable futures. The text has pictures and offers good insights from the author's myriad social experiences with flashback connections to Becoming (though unique to its own purposes).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn is a self-help type book about finding sources of and healing from generational trauma(s) within one's lineage. After discovering the text as a reference in Dr. Christiane Northrup's Dodging Energy Vampires, I decide to purchase then read It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn. During the end of the text, I think to myself, along these lines, everyone needs to read this book, because generational trauma affects individuals—society, at large—in humongous ways. Each chapter of the text is progressing toward healing through anecdotal (of practical scientific research) guidance and practical methods (of practical scientific research) for a/ reader(s) to engage. One may heal proactively with the text, from beginning to end, though if one needs different guidance, one must seek necessary care respective to one's particular needs to completely heal. One may always improve, even after completing necessary self-work on a journey of eternal self-culturing, and I find the text offers awesome perspectives to consider as one is living—self-culturing. Generational development is so important because one can start to decide aspects of being one might/ want(s) in one's generational line(s) on the basis of individual-personal action. Being conscious of a/ decision(s) one makes is so important and integral to generational development whether one wants one's decision making to be or not to be integral to generational development. Self-culturing generationally is an important aspect to consider when deciding on entering and/or developing a/ relationship(s) (especially a/ romantic relationship[s]). I find the text holds very valuable information (even valuable for any individual already complete with necessary self-work on a journey of eternal self-culturing in the best ways possible respective to one living well). The text has a Glossary, Appendices, Notes, and an Index to help navigate the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds by David Goggins is like an autobiography of the author's life. Over the past four years, I've come across very different looking individuals that have an appreciation for David Goggins and find aspects of his life's story motivational (if not just aspects of his character alone). After an interaction in a gym with an individual telling me about how watching a video by David Goggins is enough to motivate him to get out of bed to go to the gym, I recall all the other instances in which I meet people that bring up David Goggins to me (so I decide to buy then read the text). I like the text. David Goggins spreads challenges (at the end of each chapter) to assist one toward living a better life after dissecting his own life as reason for presenting a challenge for one to use (he encourages to re-use) moving forward in one's own life (after reading the text/from that point in the text). The text is a way to navigate mental aptitudes toward mental toughness in order to accomplish a/ goal(s) one might have in one's life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance by Celeste Vaughan Curington, Jennifer H. Lundquist, and Ken-Hou Lin is a text exploring qualitative and quantitative research concerning experiences of individuals of different genders and racial backgrounds in connection with online dating. One day, I open a new tab to find an article (Why aren't college-educated Black women meeting their match?) piquing my interest because of its correlation to a project I know an individual is working on. After discovering the text as a source in the article (with commentary from authors of the text), I decide to purchase then read the book. (Of 2/20/23) As a cis-heterosexual single man, practically confident in my ability to help a relationship thrive, I find dating to be more practical for me after I meet an individual in person though I am not averse to online dating. The text offers substantial research with historical evidential support (which makes a lot of sense)—not just for argument's sake:


"To be very clear—it is not our objective or intention to judge individuals for their personal dating preferences: in some cases, individual racism could play little part in why one person marries another of the same racial background. So too might interracial relationships be formed in a context rife with overt racism. Instead, our aim is to call into question the naive views that intimate racial preferences are natural, apolitical, and inconsequential. Indeed, as we show throughout this book, societal forces that insist on a racial hierarchy of desire shape our intimate desires, whether or not we'd like to address that fact." (Curington, Lin, Lundquist, 2021, p. 15)


I learn a lot about antimiscegenation and social hierarchies historically to a degree beyond my original familiarity prior reading the text. I choose to constantly learn to improve practically, and I hold no racial preference when it comes to choosing a potential romantic/life partner (though I find when women practically prioritize health, personally, attractive—because I live an increasingly healthier lifestyle, personally). The data is accessible and verifiable with links throughout the text as well as a "Data and Methods" portion in the Appendix. The contexts concerning dating seem globally aware with a focus on dating online in the United States. I'm mindful concerning relationships and potential a/ romantic/life partner(s)—romance. I really enjoy reading the text. I digitally applaud individuals partaking in the research development to help bring the text to fruition especially in an age in which access to the internet via a medium like a cellphone is apparent (and entities are looking to ensure access to the internet grows exponentially). Research of the sort can benefit dating, individuals personally, and relationships in the long run in psychological/social ways. The text informs to encourage and enlighten individuals:


"It may not be our intention to have absorbed societal racial preferences, but we can be intentional about acknowledging and not cultivating them. Who we decide to pursue personal relationships with, be it marriage or a brief encounter at a party, is one of the last visible threads sustaining the racial hierarchy now that public racial discrimination is no longer legitimated. The commodifying process of online dating has made the existence of sexual racism undeniable—and our complicity in the process has made it virtually acceptable and commonplace. In this light, searching for a partner is itself a process of remaking race. While it may not be our fault directly if we have a racial preference, it is our responsibility to examine our preferences and decide whether to perpetuate or disrupt them. Are we willing to question why we might have such preferences and what they mean about our relative positions within hierarchies that privilege some and not others?" (Curington, Lin, Lundquist, 2021, pp. 226–227)


If one finds the data too intense to read alone, I advise reading with diverse wise council. The resulting conversations may prove better for everyone in the conversation. Even the authors of the text share in the Acknowledgments: 


"This book was not always an easy one to write, and we found ourselves frequently grappling with the hard truths that emerged from the data. We each came into the project from different perspectives and varying experiences. We often disagreed, engaged in heated discussions, and sometimes called out one another's blind spots. The book is that much stronger for it." (Curington, Lin, Lundquist, 2021, p. 229)


The discourse might not be easy though may prove valuable. I appreciate the text. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Curington, C.V., Lin, K., & Lundquist, J.H. (2021). The Dating Divide.

A Song of Ice and Fire: A Feast of Crows

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Feast of Crows by George R. R. Martin is the fourth book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. I find the text fantastically full of drama and snark. An author's note at the end of the book indicates A Feast of Crows is "a book that told all the story for half the characters, rather than half the story for all the characters..." With that, I really enjoy the character plots present, some plot progressions are more enjoyable and/or entertaining than others (to me); Brienne's is drastically epic, Arya's is super cool, Cersei's is twistiest-sinisterly, Alayne Stone's (clears throat) is like a tricky calm, Arianne's is most curious, Sam's is most comical, Jaime's is most reinventing, and all characters otherwise round the world at large well. The text offers a looseness in style which correlates so well with characters' languages morally bending always giving way to honesty—truth (which I feel all characters in the story are seeking to varying degrees). Major driving forces in the text—series—so far, are loyalty, trust, and truth. I'm enjoying the series a lot so far.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Purpose Driven Life: What on Earth Am I Here For?

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Purpose Driven Life: What on Earth Am I Here For? by Rick Warren is a daily reader with forty chapters of exercises and reflections guiding one toward identifying as well as living one's purpose(s) in accordance with God's purpose(s) for/in one's life. I read one chapter per night as a part of my nightly devotional before sleeping. I find the book in my mom's home then decide to read it due to waiting on a different book to read. I discover it's one of my oldest brother's books (R.I.P.), and I notice his notes stop about halfway through the text (I'm not judging him though, much love). I enjoy the text as a part of my nightly devotional. The text has subjective statements though toward the end especially advises/encourages readers to explore more of the topics in groups—not only alone—through exercises, questions, journaling, and reflecting amongst other methods (some of which are available in the book) toward adhering to one's purpose(s) in tandem with God's purpose(s) for/in one's life. I like the way each chapter ends with a "Point to Ponder," "Verse to Remember," and "Question to Consider." At the end of the book are additional resources contributing to well-rounding sentiments of the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul by Howard Schultz with Joanne Gordon is about the reinvigorating and reexamination of Starbucks's culture through Howard Schultz's reflective return journey as an impassionate CEO—member—of the Starbucks community. During a visit to a Starbucks, an individual responds to a phrasing on my bookmark I remember (generally) choosing to use ever since about 2015 (without any motivation to other than appreciating the meaning of the words in regard to how I choose to live my life [especially from fall of 2015]) "onward and upward," by telling me of the irony of the individual's recognition of the phraseology in a Starbucks as the individual connotes the book from the CEO of Starbucks, Howard Schultz, with the phraseology. Curious, I decide to buy then read the book. Starbucks is not a franchise. The culture of Starbucks is more apparent to me now than ever before though I wonder of the consistency of the culture now (about decade after the book's initial publishing). Company cultures fascinate me. The text offers experiential lessons and perspectives which I think may be useful for any navigating coursing a company practically and theoretically. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness by Morgan Housel is a book about finances focusing on one's psychological approaches, being, and understanding(s) in relation to finances. The text offers information about finances that seems necessary as common knowledge especially for anyone considering finances, generally and personally. The text offers sound advice—in conjunction with supporting evidence from others individuals in history have come to for sound financial advice—that seemingly is timeless. While (really before explicitly) offering advice, the author is quick to acknowledge the idea of to each one's own before sharing aspects of his financial journey (with respect to his family, largely his spouse as a financial partner—toward the end of the book). I find the book posits finances in a way that encourages one to live the best life one reasonably may (especially financially) with respect to knowing when enough is enough and appreciating that which one already has or healthily obtains (especially against a rat race, keep up with the Joneses mentality). I like the text, and I am glad about reading the text. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Blackman's Guide to Understanding the Blackwoman

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Blackman's Guide to Understanding the Blackwoman by Shahrazad Ali is a book that can be easy to laugh at and/or/then slowly crawl into one's self about. I purchase the book after a conversation at a gym with a gentleman showing enthusiasm for the text. The title seems to only suit the text due to references of slavery though I feel anyone may be able to actually connect certain aspects of the author's observances to reality. I find the author is attempting to empower and protect families, heterosexual relationships, thinking for one's self responsibly especially in relation to romance, living healthy(ier) lifestyles conducive to good growth, and reasonably living in an ever changing world (at large) in which one must stand for good, not just agree with any and every passing development seeping in harmful ways toward future generations. I'm glad about reading the text. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Make Way for Ducklings

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey is about a couple (of ducks) trying to find a location to settle and start a family. During a visit for a regular STI test (negative), I find a section of the facility with children's books, so I read Make Way for Ducklings as I wait then finish reading it after my appointment. Testing for an STI is important; if you need more information about testing for an STI, here is a link: Where to get tested for STDs: Testing information and more (medicalnewstoday.com). Make Way for Ducklings primarily develops in Boston, and I'm glad about being able to read the text. The story depicts factors to consider when moving to an environment to raise a family especially highlighting education, security, technology, and traffic well. The text sets emphases on factors that might affect a couple of ducks and ducklings in ways important for anyone trying to find a location to settle and raise a family. I like the illustrations; the illustrative style accompanies the storytelling well (making the story more vivid which I think may be helpful for individuals literately benefiting from visual assistance while reading). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Before Shackles and Chains

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Before Shackles and Chains by Reuben Laurore is a book in a genre similar to Zechariah Sitchin's texts. The text feels like an opinion on parts of history though seems to veer from its initial scope to be motivational for readers. I think capturing details of intricate histories are more possible in modernity due to accessible information especially in connection to Biblical tracings. Certain tracings through the text can be more thorough. Even so, the author seems to attempt an all-encompassing historical perusing with bits of data of topics with vast amounts of data available. History is history/herstory is herstory, I think modernity offers a lot of value in contrast to data which the book connects. I do not hold any racist or stereotypical sentiments in any part of my life nor am I implying the book or author does. The author is my cousin, and he shares the text with me over Thanksgiving. With all that, I think the author's book is light years away from his children's book Luke the World Traveler: Welcome to America! concept-wise (the concept for the children's book is quite brilliant). After reading Before Shackles and Chains, I feel like one must read the book with assisting data for a more well-rounding understanding.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Song of Ice and Fire: A Storm of Swords

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin is the third book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. There are a lot of characters in the series so far. The third book is full of familial reorganizations—legacies—albeit conniving ways and battles (more so than a war though all battles seemingly leading to or a part of a war). I really enjoy Jon Snow's character development (as I do most of the characters of which I feel have a fair balance of notable developments in this text—no one character's development weighs more than another to me) largely due to his relationships with wildlings which I find make the story much more interesting. The story is full of so many plot twists: I'm curious as to which directions characters' stories might flow. I'm no stranger to fantasy and/or fiction so the character development intrigues me most of the series so far. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (Funko Pop!) (Little Golden Book)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (Funko Pop!) (Little Golden Book) by Arie Kaplan (Author) and Chris Fennell (Illustrator) is a short fun version of E.T. which only captures highlights of the original full length story. I read the book (on the spot) deciding between which book to purchase to donate to one of the hospitals Barnes and Noble has a donation relationship with as a part of a Christmas program. I read the book though I pick another book to purchase to donate. I enjoy the E.T. story, and I like the illustrations: the pages are full and vibrant. The Funko Pop! designs really stand out: I recognize the Funko Pop! qualities of the characters as I'm about half way through the book then learn the text is a Funko Pop! variation of the original full length story afterward. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Values Compass: What 101 Countries Teach Us About Purpose, Life, and Leadership

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Values Compass: What 101 Countries Teach Us About Purpose, Life, and Leadership by Dr. Mandeep Rai, PhD, is a collection of essays about layers of values in connection to highlights of a distinct value of each culture the author experiences and shares of her travels. I buy the book because of the author's Travel Noire article on Haiti. I appreciate her input and grow curious about her knowledge base. Dr. Mandeep Rai, PhD, offers a positive outlook in her article about Haiti which is a style she carries throughout her reflective travel essays in The Values Compass: What 101 Countries Teach Us About Purpose, Life, and Leadership. Through the exploration of different cultures, the author shares culturally informative stories offering a more rounding perspective of a particular culture in relation to the author's experiential evaluation of a value the author connotates with a particular aspect of a culture. I like the evocative-thinking text. The short essay form is enough to carry the author's diary-like writing style well in a way that can be quick to read slowly (a decent book for an individual with a busy schedule). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Gilgamesh

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Gilgamesh translated from the Sîn-Leqi-Unninnĩ Version by John Gardner and John Maier is an epic poem largely about nature vs. nurture through Enkidu and Gilgamesh's journeys respectively as well as together. The story is really good (even with only parts of it being available due to only certain parts of tablets being available). I find the translation makes the story a dark-deep-tragic-comedy of a bromance of immense heights that runs into ruin due to a jealous goddess unable to cope with the truth (which Gilgamesh explains as reason for him not being sexual with her), even in realization of the truth herself in multiple ways.  All the while, the story comments on destructive behaviors and characteristics branching from nature vs. nurture though heavily sets a gaze on nurturing beyond and within realms of space and time on every level of existence imaginable within the story. The accompanying notes containing cross-translation information between prior scholars, translators, translations, and supporting texts are very helpful to my interpretations of the story as a whole as well as between columns and tablets of the text. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Eleven)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Eleven) by Kintetsu Yamada is the final manga in the series! The manga resolves a lot in the series through niche moments in the end (Asako's childhood friend maturing to recognize a need for space between/for herself, the baby as well as the baby's father, work-life balance especially during busy times at work especially with a child in the mix, Asako acknowledging her maturity [albeit slow] with gratitude to her family as well as Natori, emotional-empathetic familial/collegial/social intricacies). I like the implementation of Japanese sentiments (food, clothing, terminology) throughout the series, and the illustrations in volume eleven are good, eye-popping frames (especially with the garbs). The manga ends the series on a good note, a happy ending for the series (though has subtle hints that things may go awry real quick [like the series does in subtle ways to engage potential realities of relationships] before returning to the happy ending path of the series). I'm glad about reading the Sweat and Soap series. Fan service in volume eleven is very light.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Nine)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Nine) by Kintetsu Yamada magnifies aspects of cohabitation mainly through a lense acknowledging a personal situation from a person's history which may be affecting the particular person in the present. Mysteries of Asako's childhood and traumatic history with bullying is center stage in volume nine especially because of Asako's response(s) to aspects of her traumatic history with bullying affecting her relationship with Natori. Volume nine has the most mature tone in comparison to prior volumes. Additionally, I like the cultural introduction (a trip to a festival with Japanese attire/sentiments) in the beginning of the manga, and I like the post portions of the manga. Fan service is light.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Seven)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Seven) by Kintetsu Yamada is mainly about Asako and Natori's developing relationship within about two months of living together, Asako meeting Natori's family for the first time, and different moments of maturity pertaining to each individually as well as their relationship to each other, together. The text delves into Natori's parents' take on Asako and Natori's future together philosophically indicating the importance of respecting one's house (rules, if you will, like a to each one's own concept) with a bit of parental advising toward living good and healthy. Concerning family, the series overall touches on family dynamics like siblings' feelings about siblings' significant others as well as siblings' feelings about siblings'/siblings' significant others' value(s). Fan service is moderately present throughout the text! I really like the illustrations of the series so far. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Prescription: Medicine: The Goodness of Planned Death

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Prescription: Medicine: The Goodness of Planned Death by Dr. Jack Kevorkian is about developing obitiatry in order to further human development(s) medically as well as Dr. Jack Kevorkian's efforts to get death row inmates to become organ donors, to become choice candidates for obitiatry especially members on the path of condemnation to a sure death sentence, and Dr. Jack Kevorkian's historical-social-medical-philosophical observations of human autonomy particularly concerning death and life especially in relation to the developing medical field. The author presents very sound economical and moral arguments. Recalling my reason for buying the text reminds me of the ambiguous joyful somberness of the nineties, I'm glad about having individuals engage with me—especially in my younger years—varying topics. Life is such a variety show. To be in fourth grade at a Christian school having a teacher answer my inquiries of euthanasia to then watch a classmate squeeze gerbils to watch the eyes pop unnaturally (or perhaps naturally, since it happens) slightly out of their heads before returning to normal in their heads. Life. My curiosity branches from encountering Dr. Jack Kevorkian while watching channels through a large wooden Zenith television, luxury furniture, in an aunt and uncle's living room. Suicide never looks as good as anything else optional on the other channels. Plus, coming from communities respecting religious laws via the Holy Bible, sacrifice is sacrosanct, and one must choose mindfully—wisely—that which one wants one's life to be about (which is always choosing good over evil whether one's life is hard or not because in the end all proves well with God, amen!). I buy the text to get a deeper perspective of the doctor's pursuits. Regarding the death penalty, Dr. Jack Kevorkian attempts to appreciate life in lieu of meaningless death against a societal mentality of revenge and violence by means of creating meaningful death to engage realms of infradeath as well as potentially save lives through organ donations of any subject to the death penalty with no way out. I'm glad about reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Beowulf (A New Verse Translation)

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


The Beowulf translation by Seamus Heaney is a classic oral around-the-fire-type narrative of a Scandanavian warrior's/king's character, heroics—life. The text is a moralistic tale heavily revolving around good character. I like the story as well as the story telling style, and I don't find the narrative to be overly complex or lengthy. The glorious-grandiosity of—within—the text is quite entertaining, to me.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Happily Ever Afters

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Happily Ever Afters by Elise Bryant is a young adult romantic dramedy about a sixteen-year-old girl, Tessa Johnson, aspiring to be an author, struggling with anxiety due to her insecurities and impostor syndrome after getting into a creative school. I randomly buy the book in Barnes and Noble as a part of a Buy One, Get One 50% off deal. I enjoy the looseness of the story telling which seems to be Tessa's voice: I feel like I'm reading a diary and loose text messages an author is trying to make sense of completing publicly, in the form of a story, while the author is living the story. The text has social aspects rounding characters' experiences which approach acknowledging a human as a human and connecting socially in a diverse social world at large.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Song of Ice and Fire: A Clash of Kings

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin is the second book in A Song of Ice and Fire series. I like the introspection George R. R. Martin offers through the characters, and, even more so, the outrospection in relation to particular characters. For example, what an astounding character role Tyrion hosts! What I'm quite clearly noticing now in A Clash of Kings is the aggressiveness toward dismantling and manipulating of children (though set very clear in A Game of Thrones, the first book in A Song of Ice and Fire series) as means to an end or no end. What more of a poster child than Tyrion, to be like the PTSD representation of all children from/in a savage world—always a door, an eyeglass, a mirror to immoral characteristics. What an aware-well-rounding character Tyrion is! For so many to only see outward falsely and never inward honestly—as far as the author shares—sets Tyrion in a role most distinct to any other character. Tyrion is a conduit of truth about society he maneuvers, heavily revealing delusionality about him, ironically, not a product of his environment though so in a resourceful sense for his life—a peace of mind, in a world of individuals suffering from intoxications of coin, cunning, and narcissm. This is not a justification for Tyrion's behavior, just an appreciation for a character set so well in the text, quite unlike any other so far, in connection with major themes in the series so far like children, family, and succession. I like the way each chapter allows for one to focus on one particular character though more characters are always in a mix. The text has an appendix in the back which helps with returning to reading the text after a while to continue engaging the story sensibly. I like the book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Vagina Book: An Owner's Manual for Taking Care of Your Down There

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Vagina Book: An Owner's Manual for Taking Care of Your Down There by The Thinx Inc. Team, Dr. Jenn Conti, MD, and Daiana Ruiz (Illustrator) is an insightful text about healthily approaching a vagina in relation to a broader spectrum of better health connecting to as well as branching from a woman. While browsing Barnes and Noble, I find the book in an art section before reserving the text then picking it up a day after the reservation expiration to find it, with the help of an employee, in a health section. I like reading a book of the sort because I think it's important to be cognizant of a woman's body/a body one might want to care more about, and I like to have a book of the sort in my library of books so a woman that decides to spend time with me may learn a bit of herself (if she doesn't already know information I may already/have available) especially/particularly when browsing my library of books. I find the text to be very informative of menstruation which I have a deeper respect for—through better understanding—now. I find certain aspects of the text can/need to be a lot clearer especially regarding human development as well as sexual communication boundaries. I think the style of the book overall between textures of the cover and pages, illustrations, and font styles makes the book like an adult-child-friendly book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Four)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Four) by Kintetsu Yamada divulges, thematically, a girl/woman might not like/be able to like a boy/man a same reason or way a boy/man might like a girl/woman in an overall theme of there being no clear line of relational understanding that brings a couple together to stay together hence the importance of communication beyond visceral senses (though Asako and Natori never completely separate from the visceral). Dating after college, and work in relation to being in a relationship takes center stage in the text: the text offers a couple of interesting perspectives about work in relation to being in a relationship which I find shows different emphases a couple or an individual may put on work and/or a relationship. All in all, volume four explores the importance of communication, of even the tiniest detail, and ways good communication can really affect a relationship in a destressing way (whether a romantic relationship or not). There is almost no fan service in volume four which the author acknowledges with an abrupt teaser bonus chapter of Natori reminiscing about a sexual time with Asako.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Three)

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume Three) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is a very funny dramedy. The feeding rules of Succubi create an interconnecting open world of sexual possibilities which in the text leads to Succubi feuding. Between the sexualness in the story, there are short deep moments about Renta being a man seemingly only Succubi seem to like (which isn't surprising though is kind of ironic because of ways certain Succubi like him) though Saki's approaches are different than other Succubi's approaches (even while Saki abides by the Succubi's rules and is taking a new route to acclimating herself with Renta's body sexually). I really like volume three.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Feminine Mystique

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Whether anyone has a qualm with Playboy does not dismiss a fact that Playboy is one of the most groundbreaking editorials in history to ever cover topics, particularly taboo topics, even now relevant, and not so taboo in/to modernity (consider the times when Playboy starts publishing). 


How do you think I come to discover The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan? A Playboy interview between David Sheff and Betty Friedan in the September 1992 issue of Playboy. I'm a collector, and my pages aren't sticking together.


The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan explores being a woman, a purposeful human, living with goals and meaning, beyond being an American housewife as the standard of fulfillment for a woman's life. Through explorations of economic, social, political, feminine, and masculine—human—mystiques, Betty Friedan brings the importance of having goals and living with purpose to the forefront of humans being mindfully. In my lifetime so far, I've come to experience many, if not all, situations directly or indirectly within the text hence one reason I am patient with individuals in general though particularly women (largely due to not ever knowing a/ situation(s) a person may be coming from as well as acknowledging a person does not know the same of me—which is part of the reason for me apologizing to anyone I ever feel I may have hurt in my lifetime so far—if anyone feels deserving of an apology for a reason I'm not aware of—I'm sorry. I mention this in light of a discovery in my lifetime, a person can find/make offense from a completely good-kind-non-ill-action-or-non-ill-intention in the form of a gesture because that's a way a person chooses to be/respond for whatever reason. I never dismiss the potential of another side to a story and/or another story altogether). 


I live as fully as I may. Betty Friedan encourages living a self-actualizing-purposeful-full-life—to be/feel whole, human. In the text, the economic-social-political nuances of masculinity and femininity are relevant and sound with modern developmental parameters—likely for the perpetuity of time, even with advancing/additional technologies—each nuance to a different degree. The book focuses on American culture primarily though is culturally relevant globally, an aspect of a nuance may have a culturally different acknowledgement/meaning though resembles a situation in the text (Friedan expounds upon this point in the text). I think the topics of this book are very important, and that The Feminine Mystique is a book to reference for a lifetime.


I remember going to therapy twice. The first time to address in and grow through a professional setting to handle certain types of situations with a professional. Bringing up any situation in an unprofessional setting may leave one to get an/ unprofessional response(s) and an/ undesirable result(s). The second time I go to therapy really results in my understanding the necessity to move on one's own in the world beyond any trauma—without therapy though with good-proper efforts, direction, purpose, and self-care. After reading books about my experiences (that I go to therapy for) and writing about my experiences for analytical purposes, in reflection (more so clearer now though apparent before differently)—a different way of crying for help though seeking a/ resolve(s) (which I've a history of doing in myriad ways), I feel amazing—because of my self-culturing, like a continuation of my life, beyond any trauma(s) I've come to experience (a conversation for my future romantic life partner, and, God willing, our immediate family like our children, necessarily). At my current point in life, after doing all the necessary personal work (and I'm always finding a way to improve), I attest The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan has insights of which I feel to be useful for me (considering varying stages of my life so far) and may be relevant for anyone seeking to be more culturally aware of developmental parameters of a human being. I'm going to harp on certain important topics for the rest of my life like literacy, critical thinking, good sex, being a good person—to name a few. I'm beyond so much because of choice practical processes. I think reading a book of the sort can help one become more aware of certain developmental parameters though personal growth usually happens from actually making choice action in one's personal life.


As a single heterosexual man supportive of good women (especially of the autonomous-fit-intelligent-salacious type, to say the least), I think it's important for me to be as aware as possible especially as economic-political-social situations are developing, human minds need to be operating properly in order to secure a more sensible equilibrium particularly in relation to living standards without impeding on a human's rights especially concerning privacy. Even with improvement, purposeful growth and learning is always possible. As many more social nuances are ever present in modernity, mystiques are even more, varyingly—bringing more value to Betty Friedan's book, The Feminine Mystique.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sweat and Soap (Volume Two)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sweat and Soap (Volume Two) by Kintetsu Yamada definitely does not provide as much fan service as volume one though focuses on other aspects of getting to know different sides of a person in a relationship, in different social settings, slowly including external individuals more intimately. Indications of love making are seemingly present though more so private (like the bedroom scene with Natalie and Blake in Isn't It Romantic (2019) except without the replays—unless one keeps flipping the pages back and forth while using one's imagination—) which actually helps set emphasis on the other happenings pertaining to Asako and Kotaro's relationship, emotionally and socially. I like the character profiles and translation notes at the end of the manga. Concerning the end of the manga, volume two has a few more interesting tidbits than volume one.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume One)

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Saki the Succubus Hungers Tonight (Volume 1) by Mikokuno Homare (Author) and StudioHIP-CATs (Illustrator) is the meet cute and introductory portion of Renta, a thirty-five-years-old virgin, and Saki, a twenty-year old Succubus, living together. This manga is full of fan service in line with this (so far) ironic-sweet story. After purchasing the manga from Barnes and Noble, tearing the plastic wrap, then reading the manga, I'm looking to finish reading the series. Renta and Saki are in a seemingly perfect situation though Renta is choosing to be considerate of Saki after discovering one of her reasons for not partaking in normal behaviour (for a Succubus). Both Renta and Saki seem to be very horny (and comically considerate of each other), and Saki is a nice Succubus which makes the fantasy the story is offering pleasanter.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth Century Britain

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth Century Britain by Jonathan Farina is an extensive exquisite delve into spherical understandings of certain common words of British print in the nineteenth century. The author is one of my graduate school professors. I remember enjoying his classes beyond his teaching style due to the topics, extending conversations, and my discoveries through choice research—all part of a wonderful graduate school experience. The text explores nineteenth century Britain through choice words (semantics through certain common words of British print in the nineteenth century), intricately analyzing language—derivations. The text is an intricately intellectual scholarly work with comedic tinges. I consider the text valuable beyond realms of English majors.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Nothing Personal

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Nothing Personal by James Baldwin is a collection of essays examining human experiences that may affect human characteristics as well as social dynamics. After an engagement of curiosity, standing in a line at an airport, recognizing James Baldwin’s face, the book becomes a gift to me from the prior owner of the text. The author dissects societal systems and systems of technology to identify ways in which certain parameters connect directly with humans’ physically and psychically particularly in relation to an American developmental experience though relevant in regard to any experience in relation to similar societal systems and systems of technology which the text references. I think the text is worth reading and thinking about in regard to modernity.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

You Are Not So Smart

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


You Are Not So Smart by David McRaney is a recommendation from a discussion of a random though pleasant invitation. Reading the text, I feel like I am reviewing a more entertaining version of the information from an undergraduate PSYCH101 class due to the additional commentary between the explanations of psychological and marketing parameters in relation to social developments as well as sciences. The text seems to root itself within the psychological, marketing, and social which I think is important to understand while reading the text because there are outliers the text does not consider which limits the text, particularly, to the fields I afore mention. Even so, the text proves insightful and may help one navigate toward becoming a more mindful individual.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus by Ludwig Wittgenstein is an exploration of the absoluteness of meaning and the meaningless through parameters of death and life, the existent and the non-existent via parameters of Philosophy (equations—logic—reason—). I feel like I am reading an assignment with a page limit by the end of the book because of the way the last few pages seem to summize the intentions and purposes of the text, for the reader (seemingly in case the jargon doesn't make clear, immediate, or much sense). I like the text and find Wittgenstein's examination of life like a philsophically intense motivational text urging the reader to be present and make one's life of one's own because only one can bring any meaning into one's life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

I Am Golden

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


While about encouraging reading, I re-encounter two individuals which share with me books of their choosing for practical use in a culturally enrichening sense in a classroom. I'm glad about the chance to read both books; in reading order; the first book is Mae Among the Stars, writing by Roda Ahmed, illustrations by Stasia Burrington, and the second book is I Am Golden, writing by Eva Chen, illustrations by Sophie Diao. This review will focus on I Am Golden. The text encompasses aspects of Chinese culture reflective through an individual, particularly Mei, receiving a form of generational support, and, I think, can encourage an individual, family, to culturally, as well as self, identify in an aware, confident, empowering, and respectful way. The illustrations are so vibrant and fill the pages very well in tune with the writing. I find the author and illustrator's stories in the end about aspects of their upbringing being Asian to be very powerful. As an ally, one that attempts to support good of cultures/individuals of different experiences especially outside of one's own experiences though potentially relatable, I find myself trying to listen as good as I may especially as there is only so much I may reasonably do at times, respectfully, respecting boundaries. I don't condone acts of hate. I find the text empowering and enlightening.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Circe

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


After asking a Barnes & Noble representative for a book recommendation, I decide to read the text. Circe by Madeline Miller is about a half-divine, half-nymph, witch that struggles coming into being of her own, through her abilities, between worlds of the immortal and mortal as well as between familial relations/tendencies of her youthful past in tandem with familial development of her present maturer years. The text is like a fan fiction of Greek Mythology which offers deeper-rounder perspectives of/branching from, a character from an interestingly popular group of beings in Greek Mythology, the nymphs, and the character's lineage. I like the text's approach concerning Greek mythology. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well. 


Due to inquiring of a student about a book for a class, I learn about Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People by Robert and Michèle Root-Bernstein, a text engaging purposes of creative processes, and imagination. As a creative, I appreciate the text as a form of affirmation (not in a validation seeking sense) since I am properly tending my creative responsibilities. The text offers exemplar methods that may help one creatively, and theoretically expounds creativity. I find the text is a good reminder to all to respect creative processing with, at least, more grace—patience, since each creative process can be quite different from person to person. I find the text enjoyable and very insightful.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe is a book-play about a man of learning—knowledge—that makes a pact with Lucifer after coming to experience magic through a somewhat disdainful-reverential manner. One afternoon while writing in my apartment, I ponder on the phraseology, misery loves company, and find it originates from—its rootings are in—The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus (the character Doctor Faustus of German literary origins). So, I decide to read the text, and find the phraseology (in Latin, in the version of the text I read), "Solamen miseris socios habuisse dolores," which translates to "Solace of the wretched to have companions of pain" (Marlowe, 2020, page 28).  After reading the story, I find the adage is a wonderful line set in the play, of the like. The version I read doesn't have translations so requires a bit of research, and, though the English seems of antiquity, I find it's comprehendible. I like the text, a good read, I think, and I'm glad about reading it.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Marlowe, Christopher. (2020). Doctor Faustus. Independently Published.

The Republic

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Republic by Plato (translated by Benjamin Jowett) is an extensive dialogue between Socrates, Thrasymachus, Polemarchus, Glaucon, Adeimantus—a variety of individuals though ends up heavily between Socrates and Glaucon—about developing a perfect society branching from as well as revolving around inquiries concerning justice and injustice flowing from ideas analyzing makeups—potentialities—of an individual (heavily in accordance with developments of a State). Each character carries a tone of a language (which I think is a unique colloquial touch better situating developments and understandings of the dialogues overall), the text overall seems to be a philosophical comedy respecting realities pertaining to/of the philosophical dialogues within the text. To experience and observe that which is in this extremely relevant text, happening—present—in actuality, whether abroad or near in space and time, speaks volumes on human conditions and societies. The text ends on a comically-wonderful beat of hope and life. I'm glad about reading The Republic.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Upon running into multiple acquaintances, I find myself agreeing to join my acquaintances to a dinner party. I have a chance to meet and converse with individuals around a table, about reading, and its importance. One of the adults asks me if I want an alcoholic drink to which I politely decline. He comically finds shock because I don't drink, do drugs, or smoke. He mentions that every person has a vice, and, I admit to him that some might consider one area of which I have a strong interest in, a vice, though I think, appropriately, it's not. As natural as I might consider sex, it's not always a normal topic for conversations.


So, I find myself buying then reading a book primarily focusing on a form of oral sex, cunnilingus, greatly in connection with parameters of orgasming; She Comes First: The Thinking Man's Guide to Pleasuring a Woman by Ian Kerner might not be most up to date with certain data (percentages) though the techniques in the text can be timeless. I really like the diagrams of techniques and vaginas. This is not erotica though I find myself nearly salivating reading the text. One point I really find interesting is about vaginal agenesis, a condition in which a woman's reproductive system (inclusive of the vagina) does not fully develop. I find a lot of familiar information, and I find new bits of information that I think important in connection to having more meaningful relationships branching from more meaningful sexual relations.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Music to My Years: A Mixtape Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Music to My Years: A Mixtape Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up by Cristela Alonzo is largely about her upbringing particularly in relation to her journey toward becoming, not only a more aware entertainer, but a woman of her own choice merits. I find out about the author randomly scrolling through Twitter, then decide to buy the book after reading a tweet she pins from October 13, 2019: https://twitter.com/cristela9/status/1183450846819995648?t=Np-ThvHAlwy6xj_ZrW2MrQ&s=19. I mainly find surprise reading stats of her tweet ("1st Latina to create/write/star in network sitcom/1st Latina to star/lead Pixar movie") because Pixar has a lot of films, and television networks are decades old! I like the book. I think the author maintains a comical tone throughout the text though grounds the text in serious topics as well as situations (like bullying, healthcare, etc.) progressing through chapters thematically by songs.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne 

A Grief Observed

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


On my way to the Little Yosemite Valley Backpackers' Campground, I meet a couple for a second time. The wife shares a sentiment of a quote she finds profound concerning grieving, and loss from C.S. Lewis's book, A Grief Observed. I think a lot about the sentiment concerning a loss of a person one loves making one feel like one is missing a limb. To get a better grasp of the sentiment, I decide to read the book largely exploring C.S. Lewis's responses toward God, the loss of his wife, and his life as is, in general, though after the loss—confusing, happy, and miserable, seemingly-knowingly of personal choice, a very conflicting personal processing. I think the text is a good way to explore processing loss especially for anyone trying to better navigate grieving, loss, and/or anyone in a deeply serious relationship that wants to engage in a conversation of the sort as a potential form of preparation—reasonable peace of mind. My version of the text has a foreword by Madeleine L'Engle (author of the Time Quintet) which I think is a good supplemental piece to read prior reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Chronicles of Narnia

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well. 


While helping one of my brothers and his family pack up to move a time ago, I remember finding my sister-in-law has two collections of the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. At a younger age, I remember having to read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe though never any of the other books, and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is the second book in the series. So, I decide to read all of the books in order, and I appreciate them all though each to a different degree.


The Magician's Nephew sets the tone of most of the books. I think it's a great introduction into the realm of Narnia which ties in so well with The Last Battle (more so than the other books do), and I think it is fun to read. 


The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a decent story in the series which really becomes like a reference point of deeper magic, meanings, and rules of Narnia which help explain parts of journeys in Narnia at latter points in the series. 


The Horse and His Boy is one of the most critical pieces in the series broadening ideas of worlds in connection with Narnia. I think it's one of the more serious books in the series, and, is a shifting point in tone in the series.


Prince Caspian is a good story sifting ideas of ruling magics/powers in Narnia, and an introductory into more adventurous routes thereafter through The Voyage of the Dawn Treader as well as The Silver Chair; I feel like I'm reading a mini-series in a major series through these three books, and I find these three books to be quite enjoyable in different ways than the books in the series surrounding them though carrying tones of all the stories prior. Even so, leaning toward the end of the series C.S. Lewis funnels more comedy, fun, happiness, and Narnian philosophy in The Last Battle after topsy-turvy journeys in topsy-turvy ways (which seems to really be the style of writing in the series) to end on a light note. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


The Mis-Education of the Negro

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson is a collection of reflections by the author. I find the text informative particularly in relation to history in general, African historical roots specifically. I buy the text as a part of a learning process for research purposes. I find the author’s reflections to be aware as well as relevant albeit a bit extreme in varying instances though I do not know the author's life experiences growing in (or the circumstances personally--concerning--) the early 20th century and late 19th century amidst so many different economical and social situations. Even so, I find the author’s reflections to be encouraging toward seeking routes of proper communal-economic growth, self-independence, particularly mental independence, for all individuals, even as the reflections are through lenses analyzing individuals of African descent in development with wider diasporas.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I believe exploring and learning about sexual health is extremely important. If/When someone and I decide to form a relationship, I'm going to continue reading books about sex (at least one a year), and, hopefully, my future partner and I will be coreading (at least one a year) books on an aspect of sex. As much as Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price seems to mainly be about individuals above forty years of age, the emphasis on sexual development, exploration, and health is relevant for all ages particularly for capable individuals willing to comprehend explorations of one's personal sexual developments/health. The text is full of expert advice and testimonies. I find the text very insightful, and refreshing. One reason I choose to care for myself well is so I can enjoy myself well as I continue to grow well--which I think is mindful and respectful concerning growth with a potential future partner, or romantic interest. If you're looking for a book about sexual development and health, I highly recommend Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex by Joan Price (which is full of references to other expert and professional sources).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Karma of Brown Folk

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I enjoy learning about anthropological-cultural progressions (which I find the text to be informative of, respectively). I'm glad to be in connection with individuals of varying backgrounds willing to converse respectfully on varying topics. During a meeting at work, I express an interest in one of the topic options concerning the "Model Minority Myth." After conversations ensue around the topic, one of my colleagues recommends The Karma of Brown Folk by Vijay Prashad. I write the name of the book down, and I'm glad I decide to read the book. The text covers aspects of Asians and South Asians (Desi) in relation to individuals of the African diaspora as well as to cultural progress as Asians and South Asians (Desi) in connection to freedom, economy, equality, identity, multiculturalism, racialness, socialness, and solidarity ranging from historical roots of about the past two centuries abroad as well as in America.


Ultimately, the text leads to a point of cheering, and encouraging solidarity. While reading the text, I ponder of scenes in a film, The Rainbow (1989), concerning ideas of war, the way some view parts of life as a game in a way or so that is far more real to others--far more, affecting--present. Nurturing is a part of every culture, a responsibility of each human, whether self-nurturing, or nurturing another. I hope nurturing tends toward good, the betterment of humanity overall, from each individual of and through proper nurturing. 


In the film House Bunny (2008), there's a scene containing a point about not knowing about Aztec culture though having fun with an experience of an aspect of the Aztec culture in a celebratory form (which I think is actually a nod of respect in a tasteful way--especially in a comedy) some may find fun, honorable, offensive, be opinionless, etc. At the beginning of the Aztec party scenes, I cautiously think about social points that may be problematic concerning the party though I don't assume anything, the party looks like it's a success. I do not know any details concerning the proceeds of the film. Yet, in a situation no one is being disrespectful and/or making a profit from a different culture while crediting a particular culture at an event, open to any, from an aspect of a culture, with invitations out to members of all ethnic groups, is it problematic?


Will Critical Race Theorists be in proper spaces to properly guide students concerning anthropological-cultural relations? Will individuals be able to civilly communicate beyond cultural economic-political understandings toward resolves benefitial toward future generations without bias? Individuals may be doing so already. Still, nurturing properly is lifelong. Realistically, there are a lot of individuals that are like the bus driver that kicks the trouble making kids off the bus in The Long Walk Home (1990). It's nice to get to one's destination(s) without any problems. It's the responsibility of each individual to check individuals nearest first about the potentially problematic as well as the good especially in tandem with social relations (which do not just concern race). If there's no one near to properly nurture, one must be willing to learn, and listen-- self-responsiblity, and self-nurturing are very important: both need proper tending to be done well.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


During a visit to my Barber for a Taper, as per usual, we enter a discussion about human diasporas and histories, apart and interconnecting. In our discussion, a topic of perceptions of bodies of individuals of African descent arises in relation to a book my barber is imbibing via Audible (mayhap reading as well), Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia by Sabrina Strings. As our conversation veers toward romantic realms of perceptions of bodies, I decide I'll read the text for myself.

     The text offers histories of developing pseudo sciences, propaganda -- social standards/standardizing -- particularly concerning women broadly (though specifically honing in on culturing idealogies of beauty pedestaling Anglo-Saxon-Americans/parameters/characteristics of bodies) through about five centuries (with rootings and references from further back). I find the book informs modernity that a lot more accurate research without bias is necessary concerning better supporting developing health data in relation to weight for varying types of bodies.

     In tandem with physical characteristics of women I find attractive, and developing understandings of conversations concerning bodies via histories, modernity -- I understand, tastes differ. Aside from choosing to have a respect for conversations and understandings about race and bodies, for me, personally -- especially romantically, concerning bodies, I have strong inclinations toward athletic women that care about their well being (ideally overall), and find me attractive in a very similar regard as well. She can be of any ethnicity! 

      Growing up with a mom that has a nice physique and takes care of herself for so long so well is a great reason for my strong inclinations toward that which I find attractive physically. In 2017, I remember my mom walking through my room topless, at almost seventy, with an upper body that looks really good. She has a strong body. She takes care of herself. I don't judge or shun one because of one's body type. There are so many different types of people that find different types of bodies very attractive. I think Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia is a great resource for individuals seeking to learn more about parameters of data and health in tandem with bodies and media via a historical perspective.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Overstory: A Novel

Hi, 


I hope all is progressing well.


The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers is a fictional collection of stories about the importance of stories, purposeful vs. nonpurposeful ongoings of humans, and a wonderful homage to human nature in relation to nature overall with intricate deep details of curiosity, discovery, and truth. There are a lot of references in the text which I think help move the stories along well. I think the writing is really good though I find myself reading this text very slowly due to the nature of the content. I find the text to be overall important and relevant though not gripping (mainly because of the constant switching between stories which are vastly different though interconnecting, then the extreme intertwining emphasis on climate change -- mainly trees, which I like though I feel detracts from the stories though cleverly intentionally very well set for completion of the overall points of the text). I'm glad to be done reading the text especially since it is the second of two recommendations I remember telling someone I'll read (the first being Empire of the Summer Moon).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Richest Man in Babylon

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason is a book about becoming wealthy in general though from impoverishment through financial efficiency: spending less, saving, and investing well -- to say the least. The book advises many of the same lessons though through different situations in each chapter, all of which connect to ideals and practices of the richest man in Babylon, Arkad. I find the context to be financially relevant, simple, and useful. After completing equations from my own financial history, I realize one may have tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars or more within a span of thirty years by simply paying one's self a monthly wage above nintey dollars and saving that which one pays one's self-- for thirty years. The text offers insightful financial bits which cover a lot of basic financial bases. If I ever share a child or children, I realize I can set the child or children up to have a good amount of money at thirty. Imagine being thirty, a few years out of college, mature, a bit in debt, working an alright job, then receiving thirty thousand or more dollars: for a mature person, that can be life changing -- just as the simple financial advice in the text. I think The Richest Man in Babylon is worth reading.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Collected Oscar Wilde

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Collected Oscar Wilde offers select pieces from the span of Oscar Wilde's writing career. In graduate school, I remember having a crush on a peculiar openly bisexual girl quick to boisterously reference Oscar Wilde of whose works I recall reading very little. So, while perusing Barnes and Noble, I buy the book (I'm glad that I'm finally done reading all the books I purchase on that visit). I really like the organization of the collection. Here are pieces I really enjoy (for varying reasons) and recommend: The Portrait of Mr. W.H. (culturally important piece containing very interesting points concerning the developments of gender/masculinity/feminity in societies branching from societal standards/mentalities in relation to art mediums/media), Lord Arthur Savile's Crime, The Model Millionaire, The Canterville Ghost, The Young King, The Fisherman and His Soul, The Remarkable Rocket, "The Critic as Artist, Part I," "The Critic as Artist, Part II," "The Soul of Man under Socialism," and The Importance of Being Earnest. Yet, I enjoy reading the entirety of the selection and find Oscar Wilde's writing on aspects of theater to be quite insightful.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Mariel of Redwall

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


During my elementary school years, I remember walking by a Hallmark Gold Crown in Livingston Mall with my mother during the holidays and seeing Martin the Warrior by Brian Jacques on a book display in front of the store. Being an avid reader, I remember finding so much delight selecting the book. Even thinking on the memory brings me to a different sense of joy. After my mother purchases the book for me, I become a fan of the Redwall series. So, finding Mariel of Redwall in one of the library/local book exchange posts (at various locations in Long Beach-- some, if not all, in relation to LittleFreeLibrary.org), is a pleasing surprise for me. The level of elation I find from reading a Redwall book is explicably tearing, personally, and I find these texts quite enjoyable to read. Mariel of Redwall is a fictional story of a mousemaiden warrior that escapes the grips of Garbool the Searat King to find herself on a path of recovery and redemption with her new friends of Redwall and Salamandastron to defeat evil. I think Brian Jacques's Redwall series is a great stepping stone for children looking to read more arduous books with a literary maturity. Brian Jacques implements varying styles of literary culture into the Redwall stories which I find makes reading books from the Redwall series (concerning my reading history of the texts in the series so far) all the more enjoyable. I've yet to read all of them.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis is the sequel to Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant To Be (a bundle purchase from a time ago -- two books for about the price of one). The second book feels like a heavy recap of the first book though I don't find it as amusing. The second book feels more direct and gung ho about its intentions. I feel like the core of the text leads to and from the chapter, "Planning," which I think is the book's most pertinent chapter. As with any advice/self-help type book, I think it's important to keep an open-aware-deliberating ear/mind.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Life of Pi

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Life of Pi by Yann Martel is a poetic, touching, and witty fictional piece about a writer meeting with the sole survivor of a shipwreck and the eventual telling of the sole survivor's journey from before and after the shipwreck. During a discussion about the film adaptation of Life of Pi, I recall a bit of shock at my lackluster response about the film (though admittingly speaking from the perspective of watching the film while providing amazing customer service for gym patrons sometime in 2017). So, I decide to read the book and re-watch the film. After reading the book, I don't think any better of the film, but, I am glad about reading the text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Horatio Alger Jr., Collection Novels

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I remember conversing with a father and his son nearly four years ago about life. Near the end of our conversation, the father is aghast and has somewhat of a brain fart sigh-uttering the name Horatio Alger. I come to find Horatio Alger Jr. is an author. The Horatio Alger Jr., Collection Novels consists of five stories: "Grit," "Luck and Pluck," "Ragged Dick," "The Store Boy," and "In Search of Treasure." I enjoy every single one of these stories about character and integrity. These tales are quite fitting for more than Americans alone. Even so, Horatio Alger Jr. defines what an ideal American is, what the American ideal is to be, through the heroes of these stories.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


After reading about a quarter into Get Out of Your Own Way: A Skeptic's Guide to Growth and Fulfillment by Dave Hollis, I decide to read Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis and watch her documentary Made for More. She mentions her target audience being women though I find points in her messages capable of being relevant for any human. After reading the entirety of the text, I find a few of her points can use a little more context or else can potentially come off as seemingly contradictory. Rachel Hollis uses experiences from her life to encourage women to make choices toward living their best possible lives.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Get Out of Your Own Way

Hello,

I hope all is progressing well.

I’m heading out of the video game section of Walmart and find Get Out of Your Own Way by Dave Hollis on top of a stand at the exit of the video game section. We’re making eye contact. Why is this the only book there? I remind myself I’m already reading a book. I pick up the book, randomly open to a page near the end of the book, read a random portion of a paragraph (which so happens to be) of the only theme (which I come to find out is really in only that area of the book as a central topic for a bit with a little indirect sprinkle here and there in other parts of the text) immediately relevant to me throughout the entire book, and I buy the book. It’s a decent self-help book and I think it’s good to read self-help books from time to time (especially since I tend to read a variety of texts) with a grain of salt to a fresh-open-wound. Dave Hollis shares experiences from his life to advise and encourage readers toward decisions that are not community and self-sabotaging. I think the book may serve couples well too. Day-to-day, between varying conversations with varying individuals, and varying duties, I find Get Out of Your Own Way has points that people may benefit from learning and applying. Yet, as with any self-help text, one must be actively helping one's self. If you’re really into self-help books across the board (mind, body, soul relationships, etc.), this might not be the most enlightening read for you (which Dave Hollis notes near the beginning of the text). On another note, the book offers references to other developmental sources for one seeking to explore more contexts for self-improvement.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

The Communist Manifesto and Other Writings

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The excuse of a dog eating one's homework is believable to me now and I'm glad about it. The Communist Manifesto is a pamphlet. I order a copy via Amazon. My former neighbor's dog shreds the delivery. I go to Barnes and Noble then find The Communist Manifesto and Other Writings by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. If not for the occurrence with the dog, I might not have come to encounter one of the most important historical documents I've come to read to date, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, which digs into the economical-governmental-political-societal landscape of France in the 19th century with a focus on class and revolutions in the middle of the 19th century. After reading the text, I've a few affirmations to share:


1.) One does not have time to not create, discover, and fulfill one's purpose(s).


2.) One must develop and learn wholesome-positive-unimpeding senses of life, living.


3.) The understanding of genres in different fields is important.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writers

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writers by Dr. Irwin R. Blacker is very insightful especially for someone with only an inkling of screenwriting between the craft and business. The guide is a good reference and contribution to making one aware of parameters of screenwriting. I'm glad about reading the text. I observe films with a much better understanding now.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The 10 Laws of Trust

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I learn about Joel Peterson and David A. Kaplan's text, The 10 Laws of Trust, via Yahoo Finance (as I'm scrolling through Twitter for Business News). After listening/watching the interview clip, I decide to add the text to my reading list (in September). Ultimately, the text is an attempt to build and safeguard high levels of trust in an organization. The text flows from aspects of some of Joel Peterson's experiences in his life which contribute to the developmental points in the text. I feel as though the text is especially for use as an organizational assessment-focal tool though one may find interesting insights reading the text alone. I think the text offers decent points to consider and deliberate (beyond the questions set forth within the book).

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne     

Heart of Darkness and Selected Short Fiction

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Heart of Darkness and Selected Short Fiction consists of "Heart of Darkness," "Youth," "Amy Foster," and "The Secret Sharer." I find each of these short stories to be profound and important. These contexts are relevant on a universal level. Each short story examines coinciding gamuts of internal and external worlds in a brief grand balance of immense depth.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Even the Stars Look Lonesome

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Even the Stars Look Lonesome by Maya Angelou is a pleasant-surprising read. The context is an aware appreciation of aging, being, being with art, being a woman, being of African descent, being an African woman and being of value as a person in connection with all that contributes well to their being and that which they choose to contribute from and to their being. I appreciate her points: in particular, I appreciate her points about aging, sexuality and sensuality: I think it's important for woman to talk about these topics and for men to hear women talk about these topics (especially since there are so many different people with different perspectives concerning these topics).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


P.S. I Wanna Know by Joe

Great Sex for Life by Linda Sonntag

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Great Sex for Life by Linda Sonntag is a decent book (despite the few grammatical errors). The book is dated. Yet, the information relevantly contributes as modern texts concerning sexual processes. I found this book at a garage sale and there are really good points in the text. I like reading information of this nature from time to time (even if some of the information stands as refreshers): there's a lot one may learn to have a thriving intimate relationship and/or contribute very well toward an intimate relationship.

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

P.S. This book contains nudity.

Rin, Tongue and Dorner

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Rin, Tongue and Dorner by Rich Shapero is a book about an extreme fire fetish intertwining with lust, madness, and passion. I received this book for free at the L.A. Times Book Festival. Do people entering new relationships from previous relationships have to endure so much? What are the underlying elements of a psyche transitioning pleasures with one person to share with another? I think Rich Shapero presents many psychoanalytical ideas that may be further honed in the context.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Buddhist Tales for Young and Old Volumes 2-4

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Jataka Tales concern stories of Gautama Buddha's previous lives. I received these volumes of the Jataka tales for free at the L.A. Times Book Festival. Personally, I find many of these tales, meant to encourage one to be mindful and live a good life according to a particular order, as comical in getting their points across. These stories are available for free: I think some of them are as interesting to read as some of Aesop's Fables and some of Grimms' Fairy Tales.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


P.S. I like having physical copies of text(s). Clicking the link will lead to Bing search results leading to the Jataka tales. It's not hard to find the Jataka Tales online. Happy reading!

The Rhythm of My Life: Tuning into the Rocky Rhythms of Fire

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Rhythm of My Life: Tuning into the Rocky Rhythms of Fire by Yvon Milien is one of a few free books I got at the LA Times Book Festival. Essentially, it's about Yvon Milien's romantic life and spiritual journey (which, oddly enough, always engages him about his romantic life). A few (of so many) serious questions I like to raise concerning marriage (really relationships) are: 1.) What securities are in marriage that are not already in a serious bond? 2.) What are we trying to do together in the long term of life? 3.) Are you cool with you? Actually, I might uncover more of these questions with every book I read concerning romance and relationships. On another note, every time I read the title, "The Rhythm of the Night" by Corona starts playing in my head.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Initially, I find Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett resonating with "Who's on First," by Abbott and Costello (which is, interestingly enough, accredited to "Who's the Boss," an earlier comedic reference, and years of further development). Yet, as I continue to read, I discover a dark-honest satire about the world (as much as is given of it) in which these characters live that reveals the importance of purpose. Waiting for Godot jostles living, meaning in living, information, and meaning in information. Reading this text after Atlas Shrugged really makes me think more about why and how one is where and when one is with the future ahead. This text is not as dense as Atlas Shrugged but sends an important message about doing in and with one's life: one should not let their life fall in folly or wasting; one should find or make a reason to live their life or else one is left to answer, what is living at all? Where does one go from there if not with a decision, guidance, or the will?


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Jane Austen: Four Classic Novels

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Reading Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion is enjoyable and exhausting. I bought Jane Austen: Four Classic Novels to ensure I read the stories in the collection though I did not re-read Pride and Prejudice (I'm sure I read it). I find Jane Austen's writing to be exquisite in its choice genre: I like the way her writing engages particulars of social realms (of her stories) and the routes of her descriptions are as entertaining as gripping (at least to me). I'm glad to be done with reading these particular stories and am ready to engage other texts now.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Emissary

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

The Emissary by Yoko Tawada and translated by Margaret Mitsutani is a great fusion of speckles from Japan's history debating a developing future in a fictional hypothetical world questioning design and order of an overarching world through omniscient lenses of an inner world. I find The Emissary to be pointedly descriptive, buoyant, and as entertaining as tragic. The text blatantly though intricately displays beauty and joy as well as forcefully engages secure insecurities to draw appreciation in life. 

 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Laws of the Sun

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Laws of the Sun by Ryuho Okawa initially makes me laugh (in a good way). The way the text portrays Buddhist beliefs in accordance with its correlations makes me more appreciative about active routes available for people to pursue creating a better world as well as to become better acting people. It's important to be cautious reading texts as such though I think one may find interesting points throughout these types of texts that are useful in assessing how one might better proceed with living their life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Black Poets

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Black Poets is an anthology of Black American poetry edited by Dudley Randall. All-in-all the text is profound. I read so many varying poems by some persons I have never even heard of that are not only potent--but timeless, of which I am very grateful to have come to encounter through The Black Poets.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Milk and Honey

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur makes a lot more sense after reading the foreword. As much as these poems are of women, they are very relatable to men. I think Milk and Honey's extrospection and introspection offers more insight concerning women (really anyone relating to the experiences in the text).

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

Yuval Noah Harari writes cleverly about the developing human condition in Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. As much as the text discusses historical developments with importance, Yuval Noah Harari greatly ensures to emphasize the eternally-pervasive impact of imaginations working in accordance with the ambiguity of historical developments. I find the text to be an enjoyable-insightful read.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Women Who Run With the Wolves

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estés is an enjoyably insightful read of the developmental human psyche (don't let the title dismay you from reading the text). As I'm walking out of a library elevator reading, a woman asks me about the book, I tell her the title and admit to reading the book to better understand women and how to improve my relations with women (though every person is a person with their own individuality). Clarissa Pinkola Estés emphasizes the value of storytelling as an assistance to living through Women Who Run With the Wolves in an in-depth, entertaining-informing manner.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.

 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness concerns racial systematic relations. Michelle Alexander observes and opines on the effects of social developments in (primarily) American societies. After a discussion with my co-workers, I bought the book to better understand their perspectives. Still, I notice headway in human societies, in particular American societies, and I think continually developing intellectual pragmatism will prevail in bringing about greater-diverse-equal communities globally, let alone in the United States of America. The book is informative and definitely useful for its purpose in assisting conversation on the presented matters.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

In Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society Jared Diamond assesses post-Pleistocene human progressions. The text is very enlightening. Reading Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Society in observation with modernity really makes me interrogate the decisions that people make especially when (seemingly) lacking (unless regardless of or in spite of) knowledge about human developments in history. It's definitely worth reading and may really assist one's sociological understandings.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.


The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm by Nancy Farmer is a comical story which I am able to envision in comic book form. There is a steadily moving plot within a realm of creative lore heavily set about Zimbabwe. The book is a simple read though has many details. The Glossary and Appendix assist readers navigating the text. The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm is an enjoyable-relaxing fiction: it's a casual carry along.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve by Edward Griffin is a very informative and insightful text concerning the development of the Federal Reserve System. In a very roundabout-informative-simple way, Edward Griffin presents the processes historically that culminate as the functions proving the Federal Reserve System as well as other facets of developing society affecting the present day and potentially future days. Edward Griffin seeks to resolve financial-social-political matters that seem to plague the entirety of the developing world that is experiencing any facets of the processes culminating into the functions proving the Federal Reserve System. The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve by Edward Griffin is a detailed-simple-thick read which requires careful attention especially because Edward Griffin doesn’t repeat or re-emphasize a lot of key points as much as he does others to maintain focus on the primary purposes of his text.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

The Business of the 21st Century

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

The Business of the 21st Century by Robert T. Kyosaki has come to me by accident, an incident of work. Robert Kiyosaki mentions The Business of the 21st Century as a re-emphasis of his messages from Rich Dad Poor Dad with additional contributions that may further assist individuals in the 21st century. The Business of the 21st Century is a quick and simple read. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Save Yourself!

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.

Save Yourself! by Robert Gilbreath is a very encouraging and enlightening piece (targeting white collar workers with information relevant to entrepreneurs concerning developing elements of one’s self in an ever changing world). This text is very relevant, and, as I am writing about it— I’m having a strong urge to re-read the text. As with all texts, read with a cautious-deliberating-open-mind (especially advising-self-help texts-- with so much readily available information, one must move forward with the information best leading them toward their next step, their next goal). The organization of the text makes reading very simple.

Onward and Upward,
Kevin Dufresne

 

War and Peace

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

War and Peace has been a very enjoyable read. Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (A.K.A. Leo Tolstoy) writes a rigorous story concerning many different forms of relationships between/within particular areas of societies during a particular war era. War and Peace is a very intriguing story requiring (as I think any story of such depth does) one's patience and willingness to understand the various philosophical and theoretical observations in tandem with all the other working aspects of the story.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A Passion for Excellence

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin is a comprehensive advisory and analysis piece for individuals seeking to improve in the worlds of their being. The premise engages manners that may consistently assist successes of businesses and individuals. A Passion for Excellence is for individuals willing to thrive in the worlds of their being. The information is priceless.


 

Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne


 

P.S. Improving learning and improving practicing may greatly assist in garnering successes.

Dreamcatcher

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.


Stephen King's Dreamcatcher is a psychological thriller! Dreamcatcher is descriptive, raw, and unforgiving. Honestly, I think Stephen King tries appeasing certain processes in the story throughout and at the end of the story (except I don't think there are any fair ways to--well, you have to read the story for yourself and decide for yourself). As a creative, I'm appreciative of the extent Dreamcatcher covers which helps me understand working elements of the genre better. I find the implementation of Poetry throughout the novel to be appealing and effective.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Hundred-Year House

Hi,

 

I hope all is progressing well.

 

The Hundred-Year House is a very Poetic Novel. After learning of Rebecca Makai's outstanding efforts as a successful short story writer: I've come to find no surprise in the creative processes pulling the text together. She does a great job of engaging and disengaging the audience leading up to key points in her story. Rebecca Makai draws on a lot of different creative writing angles to create a full story.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Making of Another Major Motion Picture Masterpiece

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Making of Another Major Motion Picture Masterpiece by Tom Hanks (with comic books by Robert Sikoryak) is a multi-medium fictional account of a generational progression through creativity and legacy, connecting from the early-to-mid 20th century to the early 21st century. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the text due to a curiosity: what might Tom Hanks be offering through a novel? Considering all I don't know about Hollywood and the entertainment industry at large, I find the text seems to be informing of the field, especially for any with a potential interest in being a part of the entertainment industry, particularly in connection with creating a/ film(s). The text delves into so many facets of working in the film industry, perhaps the entertainment industry at large, that receive a lot of attention publicly, at least for a time, which may shock the unaware. The text in many ways seems to inform by prescribing the film industry, if not the entire entertainment industry at large, methods of creating a/ enjoyable-functional-safe work environment(s), greatly exemplifying maturity between and through characters and contexts of the story. A reader is able to experience the story in many different ways (a screenplay and comic books) though only completely through reading the novel. I find the following texts may prove valuable in further deliberating contexts of concepts within The Making of Another Major Motion Picture Masterpiece by Tom Hanks (with comic books by Robert Sikoryak): Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan, Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell), Will by Will Smith and Mark Manson, What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez, Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey, I Can't Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart, I'm Glad My Mom Died by Jennette McCurdy, Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It by Charlamagne Tha God, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King, Settle for More by Megyn Kelly, The Elements of Screenwriting: A Guide for Film and Television Writers by Dr. Irwin R. Blacker, Invisible Ink by Brian McDonald, and A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Beyond the 80/20 Principle

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Beyond the 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch is like a self-help type book paralleling myriads of laws and principles ([particularly branching of power laws] between varying sciences) with aspects of business connecting concepts through practical guidance toward well-rounding oneto be more sound of economy (respecting all definitions of the term economy, to a degree). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to my initial branching curiosity of contexts in relation to the title of The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch, especially considering both texts are next to each other on the bookshelf, I figure the books may be complementary to each other and supplementary to contexts of the 80/20 Principle (at large) and further wonder: what might be beyond the 80/20 Principle? When reading the text, I feel a different maturity, somewhat of a reverence, as though the author is presenting valuable resources after experiencing God like Saul then walking with God through all of the stages Dante Alighieri so vividly describes in The Divine Comedy upon returning to humanity directly. A text of the sort feels like a part of a learner's paradise. The text is full of references (and is a reference as well). Even so, I find the following texts may prove valuable with further deliberating contexts of concepts within Beyond the 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch: Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, Why Good Sex Matters: Understanding the Neuroscience of Pleasure for a Smarter, Happier, and More Purpose-Filled Life by Dr. Nan Wise, PhD, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Dr. Matthew Walker, PhD, Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex by Dr. John Gray, PhD, Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest by Suzanne Simard, The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman, Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey, The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry 1853—1955 by Andrew Gordon, The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity by David Graeber and David Wengrow, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke, The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan, Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell), Will by Will Smith and Mark Manson, What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez, and Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

A World Without Email

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


A World Without Email by Cal Newport is like a self-help type book guiding (arguing and defending through qualitative and quantitative research) toward becoming a less miserable individual by way of more efficient realms of workflows and communication. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book because of a deliberation of email (considering the title of the book); I feel differently about email depending on the context of which I may be engaging with email; I find a particular context may require a different attention than email; Growing up with physical parameters separate from as well as in connection with virtual parameters, I find discerning between a necessity and a luxury an ever looming perspective to deliberate in connection with technology. If one subscribes to the personal productivity community, one may find concepts within the text somewhat familiar or refreshingly helpful (as might any unaware of the personal productivity community). Even so, I think the text glimpses a stark reality (at large); realms of workflows and communication may vary depending on an entity in attachment to any particular realm(s) of workflow(s) and communication. I think the text offers valuable insights toward ensuring one may be more efficient and less miserable in relation to any realm(s) of work and/or communication. Additionally, I find the text acknowledges well, one may have to find a way best for one's self amidst myriad forms of possibilities and solutions, even with progressing guidance (seemingly hinting toward a community at large attempting to do so which one may further connect with). I think the following texts may prove valuable for one to further deliberate concepts of contexts within A World Without Email by Cal Newport: Meditations by Marcus Aurelius (Translator: Martin Hammond), Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell), and A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Feng Shui Modern

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Feng Shui Modern by Cliff Tan (Illustrator: Dura Lee) is a guide to building/designing one's choice space(s) particularly on the basis of one's/ energy(ies), activity level(s), and what resonates with one's character/personality/lifestyle in connection with a/ concept(s) of Feng Shui. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the text due to my progressing interest in design. I find the text informative of the history of Feng Shui especially considering different culture areas have different styles of building/designing. I think the text offers a lot for one to deliberate in relation to how one might choose to design, and I feel like the text may help one understand what type(s) of parameter(s) one may be subscribing to via Feng Shui. I like concepts of Feng Shui, and I wonder how such concepts may work with a/ concept(s) of an/other style(s) of building/designing—practically-theoretically though philosophically as well.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Jungle Books

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Jungle Books by Rudyard Kipling are comical-poetic-musical-philosophical-fictional tales (with seemingly non-fictional groundings) beyond Mowgli (a character of which I formerly associate to The Jungle Book [1967] in connection with Disney) (though largely inclusive of Mowgli) of animal and/or human relations across/between different culture areas (which is reason why I decide to buy then read The Jungle Books), emphasizing laws of nature, if one will, by way of jungle laws, as though to indicate/segue to underlying schema guiding culture areas. I appreciate and recommend all the stories; even so, of all the stories, I highly recommend the following stories of The Jungle Books: "Mowgli's Brothers," "Kaa's Hunting," "'Tiger-Tiger!'," "The White Seal," "Servants of the Queen," "The King's Ankus," "Red Dog," and "In the Rukh." Between the Chronology, General Preface, and Introduction; Jan Montefiore and Kaori Nagai offer more perspectives of contexts in connection with stories of The Jungle Books (greatly considering Rudyard Kipling's life) which one may acknowledge to deliberate the intelligence of Rudyard Kipling navigating worlds personally, beyond the stories, to create the wonderfully appealing (to me) stories of The Jungle Books.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest by Suzanne Simard is like a fusion between an expounding for progressing forestry, forest ecology, bio-socio-ecology and a memoir of the author's life (inclusive of primarily qualitative research). When entering an Anjuna Book & Art Cafe for the first time, I decide to buy the book though discover the book is not for sale though available to read in store. About nine months later, when perusing an Internom, I find, buy, then read the book. I really enjoy the text; I appreciate the cultural appreciation in connection with bio-socio-ecological realms; the text really enlivens the interdependent reality at large of which all life is in connection. I find the text may help one further embrace and/or further bolster anyone's love for nature, enlighteningly. I really appreciate the concept of a/ culture area(s) of which David Graeber and David Wengrow expound in The Dawn of Everything: I feel as though Suzanne Simard brings an awareness to the culture areas of trees (and much in connection with trees, highlighting forestry, forest ecology, and bio-socio-ecology). I think reading Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest by Suzanne Simard helps bring a better understanding of The Overstory by Richard Powers. I really appreciate the My Side of the Mountain trilogy by Jean Craighead George, and I find contexts within Suzanne Simard's text resonate well with acknowledging a/ future generation(s) in connection with nature are of ongoing conversations, calls for action(s) to navigate better ways of being in commune with nature, mindfully, respectfully. The text navigates death and life (by mainly appreciating life) though touches on grief in a/ way(s) that remind me of H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald: I feel A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis explores grieving well (even considering grieving may be different for everyone). Considering contexts of a subtle wolf theme in the book, I think of Women Who Run With Wolves by Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés (though I feel as though the wolf theme is in connection with a larger picture of nature, of equality, of a theme of naturing and nurturing more so than naturing vs. nurturing throughout the text).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster is like a self-help book functioning as an efficacious diagram of stratagems. When perusing an Internom pop-up shop, I decide to buy then read the text due to a branching curiosity of the title: what is flip-thinking? The text is full of mainly qualitative data aggregating practically guiding (with immediately applicable methodologies) toward mindfully achieving a/ desirous outcome(s). I find the text offers valuable contributions that may bolster aspects of one's life (inclusive of what may be in connection with one's life). I find the font of the text easy to read. The text offers many references. Even so, I think the following texts may prove to be good supplemental texts to read to further deliberate concepts within Flip Thinking: The Life-Changing Art of Turning Problems into Opportunities  by Berthold Gunster: The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD, Positive Discipline: The Classic Guide to Helping Children Develop Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Cooperation, and Problem-Solving Skills by Dr. Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by Dr. William Stixrud, PhD, and Ned Johnson, Mastery by Robert Greene, Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, and Sparks of Genius: The 13 Thinking Tools of the World's Most Creative People by Robert and Michèle Root-Bernstein.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Watership Down

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Watership Down by Richard Adams is a captivating fictional tale of rabbits (primarily) navigating living between humans, other animals, and themselves. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to enjoying watching the show on Netflix upon its release: recognizing the title on a bookshelf more recently in Internom, I quickly retrieve the book to read the book in its entirety due to enjoying the show so much. Watership Down by Richard Adams explores economics of a living space—of family—of a society—through lives of rabbits interacting across warrens between humans, other animals, and themselves. The story contains contexts connecting interdependent realities in relation to how all parts of nature may interact. The text antagonizes concepts supporting war, slavery, fear, apathy, repression, depression, and oppression. The text enlivens purpose through each character and story progression toward structuring a good rabbit society at large—indicating purpose as not to be harmful to progress of the good of society at large. Watership Down by Richard Adams champions longevity through good health, family and storytelling, respecting an infiniteness in a finiteness of life at large. Additionally, the author greatly acknowledges The Private Life of the Rabbit by R.M. Lockley as a referential text.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle is like a spiritual-self-help book providing guidance toward enlightenment through a question and answer format (which the author explains in the Introduction of the book). When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the book due to remembering the text as a recommendation from someone I meet at a party my neighbor invites me to a few years ago when living in California. I find the text offers immediately implementable practical guidance toward being more conscious, more present, with one's presence, fully aware, with one's being. The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment makes texts like The Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself by Michael Singer and Tantra: The Supreme Understanding by Osho more accessible, to me. Additionally, I find the following texts may offer furthering-well-rounding perspectives of concepts within The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment: Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, Dodging Energy Vampires: An Empath's Guide to Evading Relationships That Drain You and Restoring Your Health and Power by Dr. Christiane Northrup, M.D., The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, and The Love Prescription: Seven Days to More Intimacy, Connection, and Joy by Dr. John Gottman, PhD, and Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, PhD.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Feminists Don't Wear Pink and Other Lies: Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Feminists Don't Wear Pink and Other Lies: Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them (curation as well as authorship) by Scarlett Curtis (inclusive of authorship by Adwoa Aboah, Akilah Hughes, Alaa Murabit, Alice Wroe, Alicia Garza, Alison Sudol, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, Amika George, Amy Trigg, Angela Yee, Beanie Feldstein, Bronwen Brenner, Charlie Craggs, Charlotte Elizabeth, Chimwemwe Chiweza, Claire Horn, Deborah Frances-White, Dolly Alderton, Elyse Fox, Emily Odesser, Emma Watson/Our Shared Shelf, Emtithal Mahmoud, Evanna Lynch, Gemma Arterton, Grace Campbell, Helen Fielding, Jameela Jamil, Jodie Whittaker, Jordan Hewson, Karen Gillan, Kat Dennings, Keira Knightley, Lauren Woodhouse-Laskonis, Liv Little, Lolly Adefope, Lydia Wilson, Maryam and Nivaal Rehman, Nimco Ali, Olivia Perez, Rhyannon Styles, Saoirse Ronan, Sharmadean Reid, Skai Jackson, Swati Sharma, Tanya Burr, Tapiwa H. Maoni, Tasha Bishop, Trisha Shetty, Whitney Wolfe Herd, and Zoe Sugg) is a collection of pieces (of writings—essays, poems, expositions—) of differing perspectives of varying backgrounds exploring and expounding feminism, in progress. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the text (glad to be coming across the text again after not purchasing it from elsewhere at an earlier time—then not finding the text at the same location where I initially encounter it) due to wanting to be a more mindful individual in the progressing world at large. I find perspectives in connection to feminism (like any -ism) can be so different (so varying to a  degree). As an individual able to discern well (as well as an individual always improving), I find the text offers much for one to deliberate which may assist one in finding one's tribe. I think one must be well aware of one's self as well as always improving one's self (seeking to grow more mindful) so as to be properly in tune with one's values long-term (though able to acknowledge another person's/group's value[s] respectfully, especially considering varying contexts of feminism available for one to subscribe to). I'm an ally to the objectively good. I think the text may assist one in finding a/ sense[s] of allyship, belonging, community, friendship, interdependence, and mentorship. Additionally, I find the following may be good supplemental texts (aside from recommendations already within the text) to contexts within Feminists Don't Wear Pink and Other Lies: Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them: Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell), The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom: Creating Physical and Emotional Health and Healing by Dr. Christiane Northrup, MD, Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez, and The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance by Celeste Vaughan Curington, Jennifer H. Lundquist, and Ken-Hou Lin.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Wind/Pinball: Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Wind/Pinball: Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973, by Haruki Murakami (Translator: Ted Goosen) (both texts together) is a poetic-philosophical-double-novel volume mainly following trajectories of two protagonists to explore conversation/conversing as a progressor of life, evolution (biologically and conceptually), love, grief, belief, education (as a valuable/viable asset to one in connection with one's life purpose[s]), psychology/psychiatry/mental health (a humane touch toward logotherapy), feeling by living/living by feeling, language (interpretation/translation), connecting in-person, pinball machines (in relation to occultism, a never ending cycle, transformation—in what another may do with what another/one creates, connecting to a larger context of the story of innovation as seemingly connecting—potentially obstructive—to well-rounding human connection though capable of being available to leave one to one's own devices which may lead to a human connection), environmental social effects/relations, revolution (between education, work, and life at large—which I connect progressively well with The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry 1853—1955 by Andrew Gordon), and treatment of space of/for death (comparable to treatment of space of/for life). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy Wind/Pinball: Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973, by Haruki Murakami due to enjoying The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami (plus, a buy two, get one free sale, at that particular time, needs three books), and I'm glad about reading Wind/Pinball: Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973, by Haruki Murakami. Contextually, I find the text (both texts together) attempts to grapple with Japan in progress from any war period prior to 1973 considering the present needing tending toward a/ possibility(ies), not a/ guarantee(s), of a/ future(s)—however so one is able to design one's future(s). Akin to the animation-film, Suzume (2022), the author reveals a beauty, destruction, lackluster, and mundanity of Japan (really, connecting to life in progress potentially anywhere) to identify a/ way(s) forward acknowledging history/tradition in relation to progressing modernity, with what is possible of life. The texts acknowledge through creative-philosophical-digressions particular contexts of Derek Hartfield and Raymond Moloney, the inventor of the first pinball machine.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell) is an expounding for why/how the world at large may be better with women creating/experiencing equal measures of life—without biasing (especially oppressive and suppressive biasing)—from perspectives of Sheryl Sandberg's life (particularly in relation to her home and work experience[s]) considering qualitative and quantitative research. When perusing a Books in English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell) because of a branching curiosity for trying to understand what exactly leaning in means, from an, if not the, originating source of the phraseology particularly, especially since concepts of/the phraseology are/is in other books I've come to read (which I'll mention further in the review as supplemental sources) about progressions of women (though always proving progressions for women and men—humanity, at large). As an individual practically-mindfully progressing to be a more mindful romantic/-life partner as well as individual (personally and generally), I find reading the text insightful (especially for any that may not be aware of conversations in relation to women at large in myriad ways—economically, socially, emotionally—to name a few) particularly because Sheryl Sandberg seems to find purpose through work though concepts of the text progress beyond work only (for instance, the author delves into discussing relationships—professionally, romantically, friendly—in connection with progressing one's choice life). The text revolves around an interdependent reality of equality, at large—even considering how individuals may differ personally, to a degree. I think the following texts may prove well-rounding for any seeking to become more aware of concepts within Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg (with Nell Scovell): The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan, The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom: Creating Physical and Emotional Health and Healing by Dr. Christiane Northrup, MD, Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton, Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey, What to Expect When You're Expecting by Heidi Murkoff, How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez, The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance by Celeste Vaughan Curington, Jennifer H. Lundquist, and Ken-Hou Lin, A Passion for Excellence by Tom Peters and Nancy Austin, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, and It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke is expounding through qualitative and quantitative research about why—how—quitting is an asset to one's life. When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the text from a curiosity of the potential context(s) which may branch from the title as well as my interest in the texture of the book cover. The text advocates for benefits of a Quitting Coach as well as methods to guide one well toward being mindfully-practical about quitting. The concepts of quitting are in relation to varying aspects and degrees of being—all within and in favor of life—living one's choice life. I really find the text mindfully empowering considering processes to ensure one is aware of one's capability(ies) toward one's choice life in a world at large of (arguably) probabilities. I think the following texts are good supplemental reads in connection with concepts within Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away by Annie Duke: Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life by Alice Schroeder, Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton and John Huey, and The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Will

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Will by Will Smith and Mark Manson is about the becoming (through an intricate uncovering) of Will Smith (most familiar to me as an acting partner and musician). When perusing books in an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book because of a curiosity branching from a reality which receives recognition in the text about a relationship between a viewer and a television in a home: how is Will Smith, at least how might Will Smith be, especially considering the debacle (of March 27, 2022, at the Oscars) post the book? I don't even know about the book's existence until recently (in 2024) finding the book on store shelves. I find the text entertaining as well as enlightening considering Will Smith's trajectories are not familiar to me at all. When reading the text, I think of how growing up, highlights and spotlights are quite different than in modernity, considering more seemingly immediate-readily available information due to additional avenues of mediums for communicating (in comparison[s] between the '60s, '70s, '80s, and '90s especially); viewing an entertainer with a filter is quite different than viewing an entertainer with no filter (which greatly requires any audience member to interact with aspects of human spectrums of being to a personal degree—of which may vary to any degree). Even with landscapes of entertainment and leisure becoming more marginally varying than prior decades (centuries, millenniums—any prior time in history) due to many varying factors, I think the text offers perspectives considering timeless aspects of being, concerning aspects of human spectrums which any can meditate on in connection to a form of healthy self-observance. 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Perfection Trap: Embracing the Power of Good Enough

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Perfection Trap: Embracing the Power of Good Enough by Dr. Thomas Curran argues exploratively-philosophically, qualitatively, and quantitatively of perfectionism in relation to psychology economically toward practical resolves. When perusing books in an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book due to a curiosity of the contexts in relation to perfectionism. I like the font usage throughout the text. I think the text offers insights that may help one (personality-wise) in alignment with concepts of perfectionism to deliberate concepts of perfectionism personally (perhaps even anyone attempting to avoid perfectionism, if not just learn more about perfectionism to a degree). I think the following texts are great supplementally in relation to concepts in The Perfection Trap: Embracing the Power of Good Enough by Dr. Thomas Curran: Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Mastery by Robert Greene, and Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

Hi,

I hope all is progressing well.


The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey is a self-help type book sharing principles (of qualitative and quantitative research, though greatly expounds details qualitatively which the author notes [earlier in the text] as a procession for comprehensibility) implementable in one’s life to transcend one’s life as well as life in general—in only a/ good way(s)—generationally. When perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I decide to buy then read the book because of a curiosity of: what might the book have to offer? I’m familiar with Stephen R. Covey’s name though not necessarily anything beyond his name. I find the text offers practical-immediately-applicable-insightful information as well as exercises to assist one with immediate implementation. I think the text can be highly valuable as is though I am aware other forms of the contexts of the text as well as supplemental information for the contexts of the text existing for different entities to consider appropriately well (all of Stephen R. Covey realm[s] of progress). Additionally, I think the following texts can be great supplemental material for any seeking a/ different exploration(s) of particular contexts of which Stephen R. Covey covers in The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change: Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez, Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, Mastery by Robert Greene, The Personal MBA (10th Anniversary Edition) by Josh Kaufman, Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, and A Man's Guide to Healthy Aging: Stay Smart, Strong, and Active (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by Edward H. Thompson, Jr., and Lenard W. Kaye (with contributions from contributors which receive credits at the end of the book).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker is a text of quantitative-qualitative research arguing for a/ modern attunement(s) between the developing world at large in connection with reason, science, humanism, and progress against all that may be seemingly heightening against reason, science, humanism, and progress (especially in light of particular communication/communal/assessing avenues). When perusing Internoms, I walk away from the book many times though keep the book in consideration, then decide on buying then reading the text, of random curiosity of enlightenment from the writer of a book I appreciate well, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. I like how the author brings a big picture perspective with all relevant data to the author's argument to navigate one toward observing relevant data showing the world at large is much better (considering modern objective points of what makes life better at large) than historically (even with its solvable problems) while arguing for particular avenues for any seeking to continue toward better living and a better world at large. I really appreciate the relevance of the book in modernity as well as a text to regard with other information of the sort likely for the next 50 to 600 years, at a minimum, for argumentative, deliberating, and/or supportive reasons. I find the text tends to gravitate about a political atmosphere (albeit seemingly touch-and-go) in a/ way(s) that make(s) the text seemingly more relevant for any living in an electing climate and/or in a freer society respecting individual-branching-into-communal choice(s). When reading, I find The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity by David Graeber and Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman to be quite relevant supports for any seeking to be more comprehensive about culture areas as well as other intelligences (particularly emotional intelligence) in a/ way(s) that can further well-round one's understanding of aspects of human spectrums.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown is a self-help-type book philosophizing practically toward living a more efficient life. When perusing a Mona English Bookstore, curious of the title, I check for the date of publication, because I find the title resonates with a/ conversation(s) of the pandemic concerning the term essential. I'm grateful about having steady employment during the pandemic, not just for any financial reason, though perspective wise especially considering my skills being essential though at the time—(arguably) not my job, benefitting from my skills. Even considering the varying state(s) of unemployment insurance in America during the pandemic, I recall essential becoming more than a floating term (similarly with the term remote) in relation to the world of work at large. Reading Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown, I find the text connects well the term essential in a/ more concrete form(s) with any contemplating the term essential particularly, respectively considering one's employment in relation to employment at large during the pandemic, personally. I feel like the text can be practically empowering especially for any individual that may need/want a/ different perspective(s) concerning being essential (toward a/ more healing sense(s), if more concrete in relation to a/ pandemic experience[s]) as well as for any that may want to approach Essentialism in connection with a fairly-more-recent perspective/practical ideating via Greg McKeown.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Working with Emotional Intelligence

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman is like a case-study-self-though-bigger-than-self-help-type book about competencies (largely in relation to emotional intelligence) in connection with parameters of the working world at large (though undoubtingly in connection with a very good work life balance). When perusing an Internom, I decide to buy then read the book because of my interest in emotional intelligence as well as a good measure of better self-culturing. I find the text extremely valuable as well as foretelling in a/ way(s) highlighting all levels of a/ working world(s) ensuring to emphasize humaneness from qualitative and quantitative data/research from decades ago so pertinent in modernity. I think the consistency of the relevance of each area of the contexts within the text proves the working world at large can transcend to extent(s) of human development(s). The text offers guiding points for becoming more aware of competencies as well as developing competencies well. Even so, I think texts like It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn and Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza can be great supplemental reads for any that may need specific methodologies and techniques in conjunction with formative communal and self practices (if one is going from reading a particular text of the sorts I mention in this review then into a social environment beyond one's self alone with a particular text of the sorts I mention in this review). I really like Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, and I think anyone planning on entering the work force on any level can benefit from reading the book. One can improve one's competencies at any time in one's life: I think the text offers more than one avenue for one to do so (especially in connection to one's emotional intelligence, respectfully in relation to the working world at large).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Outlive: The Science & Art of Longevity

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Outlive: The Science & Art of Longevity by Dr. Peter Attia with Bill Gifford encourages progressions toward living a/ healthier sounder relationship(s) with one's self alone as well as one's self in connection with an/ other(s) through methodologies and information for one to acknowledge to  improve one's health span and lifespan (inclusive of—though particularly in the text to emotional, mental, and physical health). When perusing books in an Internom, I recall glancing over the text to ensure to be reading a more recent book on health (especially since considering the term longevity in the title as having to do with biology, I like having the most recent data on what may concern health though I appreciate thorough explorations historically connecting to modernity—concerning statistics). I find the entire book beneficial to varying aspects of one's health. I really appreciate Part III because the language resonates so well with modern health necessities at forefronts of conversations concerning health. 


Due to the scope of the book branching from preventive measures for four particular diseases (heart disease, cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and type 2 diabetes) in relation to parameters of metabolic dysfunction, I think the text acknowledges well parameters of its coverage through its language and tone as well as is aware data are dynamic variables. The text informs of particular measures of analysis ensuring to increase awareness of a/ context(s) within and beyond the text. I enjoy reading the text and find practical information throughout the text immediately applicable.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Dracula

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Dracula by Bram Stoker (Illustrations by David Mackintosh) is an epistolary novel of dark comedy (though quite horrific, quite alleviating) navigating an individual's introductory period with Dracula to many happenings with Dracula from then on. I decide to buy then read Dracula because of a curiosity branching from a joke more so than a fetishizing of sexual intercourse with a woman during her menstrual cycle. The text offers moralistic values arguing for good faith even in the midst of a scourge, for efficient uses of finances toward a/ good cause(s), sanctity, good relations (largely in connection with love, peace, mental health—though mental health has somewhat of its own exploration throughout the text which makes the topic stand more so alone than always in connection with a relation), good experience through practical use, respecting cultural perspectives beyond class, and the equality of good characteristics (particularly intelligence beyond the superficial) between men and women amongst many other points. Growing up with references to Dracula (the character), I'm glad about reading the book because I'm aware of the canon of Dracula from which all other tales of Dracula (the character) may arise.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

The Girls' Guide to Growing Up Great: Changing Bodies, Periods, Relationships, Life Online

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


The Girls' Guide to Growing Up Great: Changing Bodies, Periods, Relationships, Life Online by Sophie Elkan with Laura Chaisty and Dr. Maddy Podichetty as well as Illustrations by Flo Perry is like a journal for a developing girl/woman to conversationally-opine (somewhat privately—somewhat due to a possibility of someone reading opinions of an opiner in the spaces within the book upon discovering the book) as well as deliberate/receive relevant advice on differing topics concerning aspects of becoming/being a developing girl/woman. Perusing an Internom, I come across the book curious as to the offerings of information the text might have concerning a/ developing girl[s]/woman[en] since I care to learn about women's health in (healthy) myriad forms so as to be a more mindful individual as well as romantic life partner. I think the text covers topics well especially considering the text is intentionally reaching out to developing girls/women in year six of school (prior to secondary school in the United Kingdom—around middle childhood) though I think the text relevant for any even beyond middle childhood. I think the text can function as a bridging conversational tool between developing youth and adults regardless of gender/sex: additionally, I think the text covers topics in alignment with encouraging one to discover one's self for one's self safely (inclusive of being in accordance with modern laws), without bias beyond encouragement of safe developments. The text offers references for any that may want to experience histories/stories of women as well as research more about any topics the text covers.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Sam Walton: Made in America

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton and John Huey feels more like a somewhat personal diary than a biography of the Founder of Wal-Mart, Sam Walton, concerning the meaningful portions of Sam Walton's life largely in connection with Wal-Mart. While perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I come across the book then decide to buy and read the book because of my curiosities of Wal-Mart's development (as well as my wonderings of how culturing/navigating/raising a family with financial abundance might be—even considering I understand the importance of building a family and that every family is different—I'm always trying to improve comprehending varying perspectives reasonably as best I may). I find the developments of Wal-Mart (inclusive of Sam Walton's personal development) which Sam Walton shares honest, down-to-earth, and hilarious as well as wonderfully grounding and humbling. I really appreciate Sam Walton's perspectives about developing a company while keeping practical observance of global perspectives. Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton and John Huey really brings  to light advancements of a time then (mid-to-late 20th century) effective in modernity. I really appreciate Sam Walton clearly emphasizing a calling for better educational parameters in a way of which I've never come to hear another company acknowledge through a/ practical expounding(s) of the term sophistication all the while not dismissing learning (concerning educating and training the workforce—on a global scale). Additionally, Sam Walton's competitiveness is that of not only a competitor though an athlete-now-coach that wants improvement overall regarding the/ field(s) of personal choice expertise/growth—particularly in connection to retail. I really enjoy reading the text and find good surprise that Sam Walton's once-competitors acknowledge Sam Walton (inclusive of his methods and philosophies) fun, solid, and sound for personal and business developments. Near the end of the book, Sam Walton shares ten rules to help one succeed toward one's goal(s) in life personally. I find no surprise Tom Peters acknowledges Sam Walton honorably-well: Sam Walton seems like a perfect exemplification of that which Tom Peters and Nancy Austin define, explore, and expound upon in A Passion for Excellence. I nearly tear toward the end of Sam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton and John Huey because of having to reconcile with such experiential candor having to come to an end, to perhaps not experience again—aside from and beyond this book.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

I'm Glad My Mom Died

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


I'm Glad My Mom Died by Jennette McCurdy is a memoir of the author's life in connection to the author's mother's life as well as the author's career pathway(s) to varying degrees. In passing, I recall meeting a couple of individuals reading the book so I ask about the book and cannot claim to be an individual that watches anything on Nickelodeon post Nickelodeon's 90s heydays (to me) (KaBlam!, All That, Clarissa Explains It All, The Angry Beavers, The Ren & Stimpy Show, Rugrats, Aaahh!!! Real Monsters, Blue's Clues, The Wild Thornberrys, etc.). More recently, perusing books in a Mona English Bookstore, I come across I'm Glad My Mom Died by Jennette McCurdy: I buy then read the book for a few reasons; I'm curious of the child to adult adjustment and management in relation to entertainment especially in a light of the importance that an individual may need life coaching of a sort (particularly because I find appealing how individuals that garner success[es] choose to continue developing academically—educationally—regardless of deep and vast connections as well as how individuals that garner success[es] form through and beyond educational processes); I'm curious if I'll recall the author from anything I've ever even come to glance at in passing from my nephews and/or nieces' television viewings which I eventually do even before the author gets to the point in the story in which an introduction of the name of the show appears; and I really like the color scheme of the cover of the book. I feel like the book is a necessary expression for the author: mindfully expressing can be wonderful for learning more of one's self—as well as life in connection with as well as beyond one's self—in a/ healthy way(s). I feel like if anyone can relate to the author then being aware that more avenues might be and/or are available for assistance toward healing—with whatever one might be going through—can be helpful. When reading the book, I feel like much of that which the author explores and inquires of receives ample answers through these three texts which may be helpful for anyone trying to find practical resolves as well as deeper understandings toward/of healing personally: Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom by Dr. Christiane Northrup, It Didn't Start with You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, and The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez. Additionally, I feel like the book offers many perspectives about processes of being an acting partner. As much as the author presents situations, the author seems to be indicating that personal progressions are happening and that resolves are available through particular avenues. Not to belabour a/ necessary point(s) (which I feel one may not really belabour considering how conscious one must be about creating/building one's life), I feel I must add that one may have to find one's self through a/ proper route(s) of healing to fully embrace a/ necessary resolve(s) along a/ particular avenue(s). 


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Women & Leadership

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala contains anecdotal, qualitative, and quantitative data establishing as well as supporting areas of research concerning perspectives about women particularly in relation to politics. Upon entering an Internom, I find myself browsing many books of interest: I decide to buy then read Women & Leadership by Julia Gillard & Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala due to caring about the offerings women leaders from around the world may have to share through the contexts of which the book explores (which I initially have no idea about, the book is altogether a good surprise to me). The writing is careful through a research-scientific-reporting tone though with personality(ies) which allows for the information to be as well as feel more accessible. The text enlightens about areas of being particularly in relation to being a political leader connecting future-wise generationally. Considering that the text offers that men are capable of being subject to certain circumstances as women, I find the research-scientific-reporting to be documentarily supporting more reasons for solidarity especially for any seeking the good of the future in all good ways at large between the objectively good of men and women. Noting the world at large is split between men and women population-wise, ideologically through research-scientific-reporting, the text explores nuances of leadership aside from gender (if one is reading carefully) to ensure to increase awareness of a/ way(s) to approach equality. I'm really glad about reading the text because I find the information can help me be a more mindful individual personally as well as in connection with an/ other(s).


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James mainly concerns concepts of nature vs. nature through qualitative, quantitative, and anecdotal explorations. Upon entering an Internom, I find myself browsing many books of interest. I decide to buy then read Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James because I like to read contexts of the sort to identify a/ way(s) to improve life personally (with myself) and with a/ potential relationship(s) (especially considering my future family). I find the text thoroughly uncovering—expounding—research to enlighten informatively a/ measure(s) one may take to heal long-term from trauma aside from (though reasonably inclusive of) a good therapist. I like the seemingly apparent transparency of the author to inform readers appropriately (with research formatting etiquette). I find the text clear to read due to the organization of the context(s) (at large). I'm a firm believer in self-culturing/nurturing: I find the author's research to be very valuable, not only for self-help though for other- and self-understandings (as well as a wonderful resource for any responsible for building a relationship with another—who isn't responsible even partially for how a relationship may develop?) especially considering an/ adult-child relationship(s). 


I like the research being honest challenging (if not debunking, scientifically) other scientific research in the fields of concern to guide one's awareness appropriately—responsibly seemingly understanding the importance of raising—developing—a good society (at large) while informing (elevating, in my opinion) fields of research. Raising—developing—an individual, a family, a self, is not wholly up to chance more so than choice. I find other texts exploring epigenetics and Psychoneuroimmunology (It Didn't Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle by Mark Wolynn, Becoming Supernatural: How Common People Are Doing the Uncommon by Dr. Joe Dispenza, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs That Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success by Dr. Mario Martinez) in a/ way(s) that can broaden one's horizons about self-culturing/nurturing toward one's ideal self(ves)—practically—quite interesting especially considering contexts of concepts (scientifically) of nature vs. nurture from within Not In Your Genes: The real reasons children are like their parents by Oliver James.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants (Full Color Edition [Captain Underpants #4])

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants (Full Color Edition [Captain Underpants #4]) by Dav Pilkey is a comic-book-like-novel following a pair of individuals (students) in an elementary school that have a unique relationship with a principal, with a somewhat-super-secret identity. The book is thrust upon me by a student of a class I teach that tells me I have one month to borrow the book though I never ask for the book in the first place. Even so, I tell the child I will read the book then I read the book. The book is entertaining though has many seemingly nonsensical ideas which one may argue is a part of a major theme the author is harping in quips throughout the text about reality. At the same time, I feel as though the author may be acknowledging different levels of intelligible communication and understandings on a level (perhaps many levels) that any individual in connection with raising children may have to understand to perhaps acknowledge raising a child, a human being, more mindfully. Perhaps Dav Pilkey is providing a book of hope for a/ parent(s) with a child that may be seemingly overly active to a point of a diagnosis which may not prove necessary for a child (or valuable to a child) entering adulthood (everyone grows at a different rate). I like the text as is and think the connections between the author's background growing up makes the text all the more so meaningful. The story feels like a way to empower a recognition of a full human in respect to bigger pictures of life.


Onward and Upward,

Kevin Dufresne

Look Inside Jobs

Hi,


I hope all is progressing well.


Look Inside Jobs by Lara Bryan with Wesl